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Viewing Single Post From: Celebrity Rehab
Jonatha


Anyone watch it? I managed to watch the first episode and will probably watch the new episode next week. Here's an opinion about it from the Boston Herald:

Not even two weeks into the new year, we have a strong contender for the worst TV series of 2008.

There’s no sugarcoating this pill. “Celebrity Rehab” is heartless, exploitive and downright toxic.

The latest “celebreality” show from VH1

Not even two weeks into the new year, we have a strong contender for the worst TV series of 2008.

There’s no sugarcoating this pill. “Celebrity Rehab” is heartless, exploitive and downright toxic.

The latest “celebreality” show from VH1 includes such stars as Jeff Conaway (“Taxi”), Joanie Laurer (better known as WWE wrestler Chyna), actors Daniel Baldwin and Brigitte Nielsen, Jessica Sierra (“American Idol”), musician Seth “Shifty” Binzer and porn star Mary Carey.

They are all seriously ill people, addicted to such substances as alcohol, marijuana, opiates or a combination of them. Laurer is in denial about her out-of-control partying. Carey arrives drunk at the facility and fumes when the staff confiscates her collection of sex toys.

Conaway may be 57, but years of drug abuse have aged him decades. He can’t walk. When he arrives at Pasadena Recovery Center in California, he’s practically comatose. When he is conscious, he suffers from delirium, violent shakes and hallucinations. When he vents, he sounds suicidal.

With cameras installed in just about every nook of the facility, VH1 milks each cringe-worthy moment. The tags preceding commercials hype Conaway’s next meltdown.

Is this entertainment?

A & E’s “Intervention” spotlights addicts in crisis, but the cameras halt at the rehab clinic doors. There’s a good reason for that. Given the nature of recovery, an addict needs to be in a safe place to thrash out the issues underlying their disease.

Dr. Drew Pinsky (MTV’s “Loveline”) mouths the right things about recovery, and the cast is seen briefly in group and private therapy sessions. How honest will anyone be knowing millions may be watching? The temptation to edit oneself in a positive light must be enormous.

Perhaps for that reason “Celebrity Rehab” focuses on personal drama, placing it only a few inches down the gutter of the cable channel’s “Surreal Life.” (Nielsen and Laurer met on an edition of “Surreal Life,” demonstrated in flashbacks, and are happily reunited here.)

“Celebrity Rehab” unwittingly documents an even more pernicious addiction awaiting clarification from the American Psychiatric Association: The craving on the part of some to win fame by living every moment of their lives oncamera, offering up every shred of dignity as if it will validate their worth.

Some TV shows make it fun to play a voyeur. This series will leave you feeling dirty. For those who enjoy this type of programming, there’s no rehab that can help - yet.

Celebrity rehab:
+ Medical experts rap network, say no, no, no to voyeuristic therapy
includes such stars as Jeff Conaway (“Taxi”), Joanie Laurer (better known as WWE wrestler Chyna), actors Daniel Baldwin and Brigitte Nielsen, Jessica Sierra (“American Idol”), musician Seth “Shifty” Binzer and porn star Mary Carey.

They are all seriously ill people, addicted to such substances as alcohol, marijuana, opiates or a combination of them. Laurer is in denial about her out-of-control partying. Carey arrives drunk at the facility and fumes when the staff confiscates her collection of sex toys.

Conaway may be 57, but years of drug abuse have aged him decades. He can’t walk. When he arrives at Pasadena Recovery Center in California, he’s practically comatose. When he is conscious, he suffers from delirium, violent shakes and hallucinations. When he vents, he sounds suicidal.

With cameras installed in just about every nook of the facility, VH1 milks each cringe-worthy moment. The tags preceding commercials hype Conaway’s next meltdown.

Is this entertainment?

A & E’s “Intervention” spotlights addicts in crisis, but the cameras halt at the rehab clinic doors. There’s a good reason for that. Given the nature of recovery, an addict needs to be in a safe place to thrash out the issues underlying their disease.

Dr. Drew Pinsky (MTV’s “Loveline”) mouths the right things about recovery, and the cast is seen briefly in group and private therapy sessions. How honest will anyone be knowing millions may be watching? The temptation to edit oneself in a positive light must be enormous.

Perhaps for that reason “Celebrity Rehab” focuses on personal drama, placing it only a few inches down the gutter of the cable channel’s “Surreal Life.” (Nielsen and Laurer met on an edition of “Surreal Life,” demonstrated in flashbacks, and are happily reunited here.)

“Celebrity Rehab” unwittingly documents an even more pernicious addiction awaiting clarification from the American Psychiatric Association: The craving on the part of some to win fame by living every moment of their lives oncamera, offering up every shred of dignity as if it will validate their worth.

Some TV shows make it fun to play a voyeur. This series will leave you feeling dirty. For those who enjoy this type of programming, there’s no rehab that can help - yet.
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