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Viewing Single Post From: Monday, January 14th Daily Discussion
elci525
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Honeybees
Jan 15 2013, 10:46 AM
elci525
Jan 15 2013, 10:34 AM
I've posted about this already in like posts 14-16, so I don't want to say too much more.

But that won't stop me, lol. I will just say that I can sympathize with Will, recognize and appreciate that he has been grappling with the decision, that he never wanted to give up his rights to the child out of convenience or b/c that was easier than being a full-time parent. But I can also be disappointed by decisions he has made, and his reaction immediately after post-reveal. Yes, Lumi did not treat Will very well for a large chunk of his early life. But at least from Lucas's side, although he was no angel and had plenty of meanness in him towards Sami during the custody years, he did fight tooth and nail to remain in his son's life. And I don't think Will remembers or appreciates some of what that was. Which is fine, he was a child; he will remember what he remembers, and what he remembers is valid. I only say this in defense of Lucas's appropriately intense reaction to what ostensibly looked like Will washing his hands of something so easily. Someone posted that it may have seemed like a bit of a slap in the face for Lucas given what Lucas did to be part of Will's life, given that Lucas was FORCED to lose those very early years with Will, to see Will make this decision willingly.

And when Will says more than this in response to Lucas's questions, "I need to find Sonny," or, "We thought it best for the child" -- when he emotionally and honestly declares that the life he had as a young boy was no life he wanted for his child -- then we will see what Lucas says in return. I really doubt he would dismiss that very legitimate reaction and reasoning. But bottom line is a lie is never a good way to start any relationship, incl. parent/child, and the lie Sami told Lucas was what launched the animosity and heated custody battles to begin with. When Will can sit and deal with the consequences of what his choices have created, including the right choice to tell the truth, and not want to brush the valid POV and input his father has, maybe I will go a little easier on him.

And I don't think Lucas was berating Will. I think he was adamantly perhaps, but very reasonably pointing out the holes in Will's logic, given what Will has told him as far as the context for the thinking pretending Nick was the baby's father was best.

As for Will's relationship with Sonny, I don't diminish or undervalue it, esp. in its importance to Will. I don't think I ever said that his wanting to seek Sonny was weak. But it isn't a priority. Maybe Will thinks it is, and that is fair, but now that a child is in the picture, Sonny is not a priority. Boyfriend, girlfriend, whatever - not the priority. And I think that is part of what Lucas was trying to get across.
Well, we're going to have to disagree. I do not believe Lucas would have been so scornful or dismissive of a serious girlfriend Will had.

And the fact is that as wrong as he has been, Will has never washed his hands of this child, and he jumped at the chance to be the godfather and was cut off by Nick. I was responding specifically to the idea that Will didn't care about his child and only cared about his boyfriend, which is not true and we can agree on that.

I stand by the fact that I'd like to see someone who claims to love Will show him some compassion, and that's in the context of seeing him try to do the right thing. It's because I like Lucas as a character that I would like it to have been him, and I would like to have seen him assume the best and not the worst of his son.
That would be ideal of course. But I think this PARTICULAR turn of events hold such a ripe, raw, emotional resonance for Lucas and takes him right back to a familiar place, that that is where he is coming from. I don't think it's assuming the worst in Will. It's maybe being tunnel-visioned that he can only remember how he felt once he learned the truth of Will's paternity, and now seeing that Will is making a willing choice to give up fatherhood, he can't understand. What he can see and remember right now are his own memories, his own experiences, and they still hold such a potency that it invokes in him an emotional response. I don't think that is the same as thinking the worst in Will, and honestly I don't fault him for going to that place first. Which is why an articulate, substantive response from Will describing his also reasonable POV is most necessary, to have an effective, cogent dialogue.
Edited by elci525, Jan 15 2013, 11:36 AM.
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Monday, January 14th Daily Discussion · DAYS: News, Spoilers & Discussion