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Viewing Single Post From: Spoilers for the week of August 5th
jwsel
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concerned
Jul 31 2013, 04:33 PM
jwsel
Jul 31 2013, 12:05 PM
Honeybees
Jul 31 2013, 11:41 AM
jwsel
Jul 30 2013, 11:35 PM

Quoting limited to 4 levels deep
I cosign this.

I'll also point out that the daughter of Jack Deveraux and Jennifer Horton is wholly defined by the men she wants or doesn't want and has no life outside her own love life/sacred virginity or creepily obsessing with her mother's love life. It's a damn shame.
And it's not just Abby and Jeannie Theresa. Look at the storylines for Gabi, Nicole, Melanie, and Chloe over the last three years. Virtually every storyline has centered on finding or keeping a man or on being a mother.

When the show wonders why it can't connect with the core demographic, maybe it should look at its young women. I watched an episode of Pretty Little Liars last night that my friend wrote. Those young women have relationships, but they also have family issues, school problems, career ambitions, conflicts with friends, and the big plot conflicts. I don't see why Days can't write its young women with more dimensions and aspirations.
Nicole had family issues. Not what you meant right.
Nicole's family issues have barely been touched on in the past few years (except for the brief triangle with Taylor, but that was over a man). She went from a character with some dimension to this character who is defined by whichever man she is sleeping with/chasing at the moment. The same with Chloe, who was smart and had aspirations to be an opera singer.

When I look at the women in the supercouples, as much as they were associated with their male counterpart, each had a career that played a major role in defining who she was as a person. Marlena was a psychiatrist and that gave her insight and understanding about things that others overlooked. Hope was a cop/PI, so she was tougher than her outer appearance and had a need to prove she was more than the rich girl she was perceived to be. Kim was a former prostitute turned counselor, the ultimate survivor, who had lived a life of secrets and wanted to help others avoid the same pain she endured. Kayla was a nurse, who always wanted to help cure the sick and fix anyone who needed her help -- even when they claimed they didn't want it. Jennifer was a reporter who was always trying to get to the truth, even when it put her in harm's way. Those jobs weren't just random things the characters did; they reflected the characters' natures and they provided tremendous fodder for storylines over the years.

Many of the best relationship plots grew out of things from characters' jobs. Lawrence Alamain and Alamainia came from Jennifer wanting to do a story on a missing heiress. A lot of Steve and Kayla storylines grew out of the Emergency Center. Hope being a cop put her in the middle of the third prism and the cartel storylines. Their relationships were still front-and-center during all of those storylines, but the characters did not seem to exist solely to chase their men. It seemed like they might actually have a life without a man, as shocking as that might seem.
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Spoilers for the week of August 5th · DAYS: News, Spoilers & Discussion