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The strike IS happening. :(
Topic Started: Nov 1 2007, 11:10 PM (2,977 Views)
jcar03
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We don't really want it to slow down. If the holiday's causes negotitations to stop then there won't be a resolve.

Would the residuals affect soaps be acquired for classical showings? I know that older shows actors don't get risduals do to the contracts they signed at the time didn't have that aspect in them. I think it would be a from the date the contract is signed and then residuals would have to be paid out. I could be wrong though.
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Deleted User
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O-M-G.

Roger Trivanti, a studio head, just went into a diatribe on television saying how the writers were crying poverty without just cause. They get $200,000 a year, roughly, he said (compared to his $20 mil). His speech went on for about three minutes, after which he said to writers everywhere, "I hope you guys get ass cancer and DIE."



It's okay, though. It was on SNL. :lol:

But I was waiting for SNL to do commentary on this.

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bellcurve
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JERSoapsFan
Nov 3 2007, 11:20 PM
Roger Trivanti, a studio head, just went into a diatribe on television saying how the writers were crying poverty without just cause. They get $200,000 a year, roughly, he said (compared to his $20 mil). His speech went on for about three minutes, after which he said to writers everywhere, "I hope you guys get ass cancer and DIE."

Wow. That sounds like a scab joke. LOL.
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Q Steph
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Put your hands up for Obama

JERSoapsFan
Nov 3 2007, 11:20 PM
O-M-G.

Roger Trivanti, a studio head, just went into a diatribe on television saying how the writers were crying poverty without just cause. They get $200,000 a year, roughly, he said (compared to his $20 mil). His speech went on for about three minutes, after which he said to writers everywhere, "I hope you guys get ass cancer and DIE."



It's okay, though. It was on SNL. :lol:

But I was waiting for SNL to do commentary on this.

LOL, I saw that last night.
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Ally
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The Royal Princess

Oh shit we're screwed for things too

They are striking at Studios which may effect shooting schedules and arrivals/depatures of cast members/crew

For instance:

CBS RADFORD STUDIOS
4024 Radford Avenue
Studio City, CA 91604
Meeting Point: In front of Main Gate on Radford Ave.
Parking Option: Street Parking on Radford Ave


That's where Passions shoots, other places found here: http://www.wga.org/subpage_member.aspx?id=2536
:shame:

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Mason


Crap, crap, crappity crap!
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Q Steph
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Put your hands up for Obama

I must be the only one who is happy about this. They should strike for a share of the profits; writers are unsung heroes. In the meantime, I want to desperately take one of their jobs.
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bellcurve
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Ally, the one son the list don't only affect PASSIONS. They affect every single studio a West Coast soap is taped...

GH:
PROSPECT STUDIOS
4151 Prospect Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Meeting Point: Main Gate on Prospect Ave
Parking Option: Street parking on Prospect Ave.

Y&R/B&B:
CBS TELEVISION CITY
7800 Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Meeting Point: Ge nesee Ave Gate
Parking Option: Streets North of Beverly Blvd or Grove Parking Structure

DAYS:
NBC BURBANK
3000 W Alameda Ave
Burbank, CA
Meeting Point: Under the Johnny Carson sign - in the park
Parking Option: Street parking on California
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Mason


Q Steph
Nov 4 2007, 05:55 PM
I must be the only one who is happy about this. They should strike for a share of the profits; writers are unsung heroes. In the meantime, I want to desperately take one of their jobs.

Writers should be paid what they're owed, but on the other hand, they're not exactly paupers. As it is, they already make some of the best money in the business. In some cases, probably even more than actors. Even though I want to be a TV writer-producer in the future, it's hard for me to really feel sorry for them, or agree with this strike.
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daysfan
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bellcurve
Nov 4 2007, 06:55 PM
Ally, the one son the list don't only affect PASSIONS. They affect every single studio a West Coast soap is taped...

GH:
PROSPECT STUDIOS
4151 Prospect Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Meeting Point: Main Gate on Prospect Ave
Parking Option: Street parking on Prospect Ave.

Y&R/B&B:
CBS TELEVISION CITY
7800 Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Meeting Point: Ge nesee Ave Gate
Parking Option: Streets North of Beverly Blvd or Grove Parking Structure

DAYS:
NBC BURBANK
3000 W Alameda Ave
Burbank, CA
Meeting Point: Under the Johnny Carson sign - in the park
Parking Option: Street parking on California

But Passions is taped on the West Coast if I am not mistaken.
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Ally
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The Royal Princess

daysfan
Nov 4 2007, 07:12 PM
bellcurve
Nov 4 2007, 06:55 PM
Ally, the one son the list don't only affect PASSIONS. They affect every single studio a West Coast soap is taped...

GH:
PROSPECT STUDIOS
4151 Prospect Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Meeting Point: Main Gate on Prospect Ave
Parking Option: Street parking on Prospect Ave.

Y&R/B&B:
CBS TELEVISION CITY
7800 Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Meeting Point: Ge nesee Ave Gate
Parking Option: Streets North of Beverly Blvd or Grove Parking Structure

DAYS:
NBC BURBANK
3000 W Alameda Ave
Burbank, CA
Meeting Point: Under the Johnny Carson sign - in the park
Parking Option: Street parking on California

But Passions is taped on the West Coast if I am not mistaken.

Yes it is...

All those mentioned above tape on the west coast... We got it from the West WGA site.
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Kenny
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If the strike lasts long enough, and SOAPnet is forced to air classic episodes of the soaps in place of the same-day episodes, which would you be most happy to see?

For Days, I'd love to see material from the "Carly Buried Alive" storyline, as well as anything from 1996/1997 (Paris, and the eventual Secret Room storyline)...

Then again, SOAPnet might just decide to air extra helpings of 90210 in place of the regular soaps.
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Mason


Psh, if anything, Frons will just use it as an excuse to put on an even more obscene amount of his precious GH. I can just see it now, "Survive the strike with extra doses of classic General Hospital!" Either that or more reality shit. Classic DAYS would be too good to be true.
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daysfan
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Mason AKA Hogan
Nov 6 2007, 09:42 AM
Psh, if anything, Frons will just use it as an excuse to put on an even more obscene amount of his precious GH. I can just see it now, "Survive the strike with extra doses of classic General Hospital!" Either that or more reality shit. Classic DAYS would be too good to be true.

As much as I expect that, I also would expect some Days! After all he does make it out as his non-ABC pet.

I'd like to see the Sam impersonating Marlena story(though I highly doubt THAT would happen), mabye the Salem Slasher or Strangler, the Cruise of Deception, and possibly some of the Prism storyline! And then from the nineties I'd love to see the Kristen/Susan story.

I'd doubt I'd want to see ANYTHING from this century.
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King
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[dohtml]<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/oJ55Ir2jCxk&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/oJ55Ir2jCxk&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>[/dohtml]
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Ally
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The Royal Princess

great clip and informative too.

thanks mike
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OneBadKitty
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The WGA should be complaining about the DVD royalties because they've really been taking it in the ass. 4 cents off of every DVD sale and all they want is 8 cents.
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Tammy
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Well this sucks. :soapbox:

I was just thinking though... wouldn't it be odd if the soaps (esp DAYS) showed re-runs and got HIGHER ratings then they are now. Oddly that thought puts a smile on my face ;)
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ljacks13
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http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/life/...ss&cat=&sid=101

Soap operas still bubbling -- for now
Monday, November 12, 2007 3:45 AM
By Jacques Steinberg

New York Times News Service


Amid the sidelining of the late-night talk shows until further notice -- thanks to the strike by film and TV writers -- are other uncertainties:

Will the passionate kiss recently shared by Marina and Cyrus after his near death trigger a permanent reconciliation?

Marina and Cyrus are characters on the CBS soap opera Guiding Light.

Like their fictional brethren on the other daytime dramas, their future -- or at least who will script their future -- could soon become as unsure as the prospects of Ric surviving surgery on General Hospital.

Networks seldom show reruns of soap operas, unlike talk shows and sitcoms.

They prefer instead to keep the interwoven narratives churning -- through five new episodes a week during most every week of the year.

For the immediate future, viewers addicted to soaps should have few worries: The producers of most of the shows possess finished or nearly finished scripts for episodes scheduled to be broadcast through January or even beyond.

But because the episodes of daytime dramas are mapped out so far in advance, the networks will soon have to confront the question of whether to entrust their forthcoming plots to the unseasoned pens of executives and producers, or writers who are not part of the union. That's what happened in 1988, when a strike by the same union, the Writers Guild of America, dragged on for more than five months.

"They won't go dark," predicted Stephen Demorest, a writer for All My Children whose previous credits include General Hospital and As the World Turns. "They won't put on game shows. They won't do reruns."

The networks themselves have said little more than that their daytime serials will go on, while refusing to discuss any contingency plans.

On its face, the labor dispute between writers and their employers -- centered largely on potential royalties from DVDs and online ventures -- would seem to have little bearing on soap-opera writers, whose wares are eminently perishable.

But like the rest of the traditional media, daytime dramas have already begun to migrate, however tentatively, to the Web. NBC, which had three soap operas on broadcast television as recently as 1999 -- Days of Our Lives, Passions and Another World -- has only Days left. (Passions lives on only DirecTV, a satellite service.)

NBC's newest soap, Coastal Dreams, can be seen only online, at nbc.com. And its principal writer isn't, as yet, covered by the guild contract, said David Rupel, a guild strike captain and a writer for Guiding Light.

"I think the strike is very relevant to us," said Rupel, who previously wrote for General Hospital. "Guiding Light, we celebrated our 75th anniversary this year, which is great. But the soap market is dwindling on TV. In five years, three years or even two, we could be on the Internet."

Courtney Simon, a veteran writer for As the World Turns, noted that her series and The Young and the Restless, another CBS drama, had recently mounted a limited, online run of an amalgam of both shows called L.A. Diaries.

"I think it's the wave of the future," she said. "And it's going to hit home very soon."

But in expressing his solidarity with striking writers from other genres, Demorest, who has written daytime dramas for more than two decades, gave a more basic reason: "We benefit from the same benefits, pensions and health plans."

With no break for repeats or hiatuses, Demorest said, he tended to think of himself and his fellow soap scribes as "the blue-collar part of the business. We work 52 weeks a year and get a check every week."

The minimum salary for such work might run from $1,600 a week (for a minimum of 13 weeks) for a script editor, to $20,000 a week for a veteran head writer.

Typically such series are written by teams of experienced writers -- it isn't unusual for a soap writer to stay in the business 15 years or more -- who lend vast institutional knowledge to questions such as whether one character has already slept with another or is distantly related to a third.

Most shows are as well-oiled behind the scenes as a General Motors assembly line. In a typical model the head writer roughs out the synopsis of a week's worth of episodes, then gives those plots to another set of writers to outline individual scenes in more detail. Each episode is then divvied up among another team of writers, to supply the dialogue, before an editor provides a final gloss.

Some soap producers, said Simon of As the World Turns, have probably thought about writing an episode.

Although they might soon get the chance, she has a warning for them:

"It really requires a relentless pace."
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Angie79
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Royal Reporter

Soap writers cross the picket line
'Restless' scribes opt for 'financial core' method


Several WGA scribes on sudsers have decided to cross the picket line to keep their jobs.

According to several people with knowledge of the situation, a high-ranking writer-producer on CBS's "The Young and the Restless" has informed the WGA that he plans to go "financial core" -- that is, give up full membership in the guild and withhold the dues spent on political activities in order to continue writing during the strike.

Another source with knowledge of the situation added that two other scribes on "Y&R" have also opted for financial core status, and one other is considering it. A writer on NBC's "Days of Our Lives" may also be considering crossing the picket line.

The WGA -- which recently formed a special committee to handle info about strikebreaking -- refused to comment Monday on whether any members have gone fi-core. "This is an internal matter that we choose not to discuss," guild spokesman Gregg Mitchell said.

Defections are still very much the exception to a strike that has, at least so far, generated widespread public displays of solidarity among scribes of all levels. There have been no reports of writers on primetime or latenight skeins picking up their pens, and a slew of top showrunners have continued to withhold producing services despite studio threats to hold them in breach of contract (Daily Variety, Nov. 7).

Daytime, however, is a very different beast.

Ratings for the daypart have been in decline for years, with several sudsers barely hanging on. NBC, for example, has made it clear that "Days of Our Lives" may not be renewed when its license agreement expires. There's been talk for years about CBS cutting one of its soaps, too.

That's one reason why networks have been scrambling to make sure their soaps stay in production. A long stretch of pre-emptions or repeats -- like the one that occurred during the O.J. Simpson trial -- could prove fatal.

Sudser producers have been saying for weeks that a strike wouldn't shut them down, but they've carefully avoided explaining just how they'd continue to operate sans scribes.

"ABC's daytime dramas are written well into the new year, and we will continue to produce original programming with no repeats and without interruption," the Alphabet said in a statement released last week.

During the 1988 walkout, network and studio execs -- along with non-WGA scribes -- were enlisted to keep the sudsers lathered up. There were also widespread reports of WGA scribes writing scripts at home and finding a way to get those scripts into producers' hands without physically crossing a picket line.

"You'd hear stories about scripts being dropped off behind a trash can or in an alley," one soap veteran said.

It's believed some scribes may once again risk the wrath of their union by working behind the scenes. One daytime insider said she's heard reports of scribes on Procter & Gamble and ABC-Disney-produced sudsers "working in the shadows."

What's surprising about the "Y&R" and "Days" scribes' moves is that the writers appear to be owning up to their decision to keep writing for the soaps rather than trying to hide their actions.

That said, the vast majority of soap scribes appear to be keeping their computers turned off.

In the case of "Y&R," production entities Sony Pictures Television and Bell Dramatic Serial Co. appear to have settled in for the long haul.

During a meeting last week, staffers on "Y&R" were all but told that the show would go on without exec producer-head writer Lynn Marie Latham. Latham ("Homefront") is known to be a strong WGA supporter, and producers have prepared for her absence by laying off her assistant, cleaning out her desk and assigning a Sony exec to work from her office, according to a person familiar with the situation.

As a hyphenate, Latham could still render showrunning services, but has opted not to do any work on "Y&R" during the strike.

"Bold and the Beautiful" showrunner Bradley Bell -- whose family owns the skein -- has also demonstrated allegiance to the WGA and the strike. He walked the picket line in front of CBS Television City on the first day of the stoppage.

Strike-breaking is a serious issue for the WGA, and its strike rules require members to report any activity in that realm. Discipline for violations can include expulsion, suspension, fines and censure; nonmembers who perform banned work during a strike will be barred from joining the WGA.

When the strike rules were issued a month ago, the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers responded with information on its Web site showing how to go fi-core and pointing out that WGA members who take that step can't be disciplined for working during a strike.

But, given the high stakes of the conflict, it's probable the WGA would move to publicly embarass members who take such a step. WGA West members received an email over the weekend from Dan Wilcox, chair of the newly formed WGA West Strike Rules Compliance Committee and a member of the WGA West's Board.

"The mission of the SRCC is to ensure that the Strike Rules are strictly enforced. The SRCC will primarily concentrate its efforts on unearthing and discouraging scab writing. There is no more fundamental working rule than the prohibition against a WGA member performing struck work."

Wilcox noted that the strike rule states: "You must inform the Guild of the name of any writer you have reason to believe is engaged in strike-breaking activity or other scab writing."

"If you have suspicions about a particular writer or project, the best way to report them will be to call our hotline," he added. "We'll handle your call discreetly. Our purpose is not to punish people; it is to head off scab work before it can undermine the strike."

Wilcox also said that leaders of WGA are eager to keep the strike short.

"Unfettered scab writing will only lengthen it," he added. "The simplest and most effective thing you can do to speed things up is to share information with the SRCC."

http://www.variety.com/article/VR111797585...egoryid=14&cs=1
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