Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]



Hello, soap fans -- and welcome to Daytime Royalty!

For those unfamiliar, we are an uncensored community for fans and lovers of the daytime genre. We have a no-holds-barred atmosphere in regards to the shows, writers, actors etc. but we do not allow member bashing in any form.

You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.

Join our community!

If you're already a member, please log in to your account to access all of our features.

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
THE PEACOCK PLUCKS $500M; What does this mean for Days?
Topic Started: Oct 18 2008, 06:42 PM (2,374 Views)
King
Member Avatar


It might happen. I mean drama on the radio was completely wiped out by TV. Maybe Computers will eventuallly wipe out TV.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Rakesh198
Member Avatar


jcar03
Oct 19 2008, 01:05 AM
Well DAYS has already been renewed and their is obviously going to be a budget cut that goes along with that.
Someone reliable told me it wasn't....
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Rakesh198
Member Avatar


I'm not worried at all if NBC pulls the plug on Days. Sony owns Days and Sony makes lots of money from other countries because of their soaps. Sony and Corday will find another network.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
ladyofthelake
Member Avatar
Professor-in-training

More speculation. I really wish these "reliable" sources had names and I wish they would just say something.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Rakesh198
Member Avatar


ladyofthelake
Oct 19 2008, 12:46 PM
More speculation. I really wish these "reliable" sources had names and I wish they would just say something.
Joe the plumber.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
PhoenixRising05
Member Avatar
GET EM STEPH!!

jane1978
Oct 19 2008, 08:11 AM
IHeartDRRick
Oct 19 2008, 07:04 AM
Unprofitable for big affiliates who could make more money with syndicated programming or an additional news hour? Absolutely, without a doubt, 1000%. Daytime is no longer a network issue. It's all about the affiliates and if they are not making money, they want control and NBC has allowed its affiliates to trample over their daytime lineup for years. When you've got the #2 soap in America airing in late night TV for an hourlong afternoon newscast, you finally realize that very little is safe or sacred where the daytime lineup is concerned.

And what little money DAYS makes for NBC isn't going to come close to recouping a $500 Million Dollar loss. NBC's daypart efforts are better suited in the market of syndication, where they own cheaper properties like Game Shows(DEAL OR NO DEAL), talk shows(ELLEN, SPRINGER), and celebrity news shows(ACCESS HOLLYWOOD). NBC is no longer interested in soaps. I'll eat crow, feathers and all if I'm wrong and bow to your holiness, but to see news like this and just assume "budget cuts," oy vey.
I dont know if you have some inside info or are just assuming like everyone else, but this is exactly what Im saying. I have no doubt if NBC was sure it makes more sense financially to replace DAYS with some gameshow or talkshow, or whatever else, they would do it.

But it didnt happen so far, NBC is keeping DAYS and even promoting it and resurrecting a huge fan event for its fans which was already canceled. If the replacements were so viable and profitable as you believe DAYS would be replaced long time ago, and not just DAYS but all soaps (except Y/R and B/B) on all networks because the numbers are +- the same.

Besides ratings are falling across the board, its not just soaps. And I think there was even an article not so long ago claiming even in the current tough times daytime soaps are still the safest way to reach those desired 18-34 and 18-49 women. Of course, when there is a big local news to report it makes sense for the affiliates to reschedule, because more people is interested in the news than soap. But is there that kind of news every day, 260times per year?

As Im saying Im no insider and I have no idea what kind of talks are going/or went between NBC/Corday and Sony, so maybe Im terribly wrong and the show will be gone next year. But looking from outside Im actually feeling more positive than the last negotiation.
I agree, Jane.

If Days were cancelled, it would've been done by now. I think the extent of the budget cuts is what is keeping this deal from being done.

Sorry but hiring two new actors, re-signing current ones, bringing back a fan event, increasing promotion, and releasing a ratings press release for the first time in at least over a year to hype the show's highest demo numbers in over a year does not equal being cancelled. A show would be tying up loose ends and beginning the process of ending things. It's nearly November and the show would be leaving the air in March if canceled. Word would've leaked by now. You would be able to tell with some of the actors what was going on. A few months ago, I could buy the whole "It's canceled but NBC is hiding it" theory because cast members were barely talking and the show was a mess behind the scenes. I can't buy that now. Things have straightened out and NBC has to be happy with it in some capacity. Otherwise, why all the promotion? Why the fan event? Why a press release that hypes the show's accomplishment in demos? It doesn't make sense to do all that, among other things, if a show is already canceled.

The show is still making money and what goes forgotten is the fact that NBC seems committed to demos now and not so much HH numbers. Having said that, a 1.9 HH rating means more then it would've years ago. The value is different. Not clear on the details but I do know it's been discussed that a 1.9 ratings a few years ago would equal something higher.

I so agree with Rakesh that Corday and Sony would probably find another network. However, it seems like some in this thread are hinting at knowing something. If you do, post it. Otherwise, given the seriousness of this, I wouldn't hint at anything and just leave it alone. I mean, the DR posted a few weeks ago the show was renewed and I very much doubt they would post something like that if they didn't have enough reason to believe it. If things were going bad for Days, there is enough media outlets out there that something would be hinted at or leaked out. This is Days we are talking about. Everything leaks.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
PhoenixRising05
Member Avatar
GET EM STEPH!!

King
Oct 19 2008, 11:47 AM
It might happen. I mean drama on the radio was completely wiped out by TV. Maybe Computers will eventuallly wipe out TV.
Probably will.

I doubt a network as big as NBC will fold. Eventually, they will get something right LOL. I mean, they have CNBC and MSNBC and they also are teamed with Universal and owned by GE. It would be a big deal for something that big to go down. Maybe they could move everything to the net but that's about it.

I see NBC, CBS, Fox, and ABC being fine but I do see more reliance on computers for entertainment purposes so who knows what will be done. For the foreseeable future, it will likely be what it is now with people using both as sources to watch shows and what not.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
OneBadKitty
Member Avatar


Until the show officially announces that it's been renewed, it has not been. It doesn't matter whose source told who what.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
FanODays


PhoenixRising05
Oct 19 2008, 12:56 PM
jane1978
Oct 19 2008, 08:11 AM
IHeartDRRick
Oct 19 2008, 07:04 AM
Unprofitable for big affiliates who could make more money with syndicated programming or an additional news hour? Absolutely, without a doubt, 1000%. Daytime is no longer a network issue. It's all about the affiliates and if they are not making money, they want control and NBC has allowed its affiliates to trample over their daytime lineup for years. When you've got the #2 soap in America airing in late night TV for an hourlong afternoon newscast, you finally realize that very little is safe or sacred where the daytime lineup is concerned.

And what little money DAYS makes for NBC isn't going to come close to recouping a $500 Million Dollar loss. NBC's daypart efforts are better suited in the market of syndication, where they own cheaper properties like Game Shows(DEAL OR NO DEAL), talk shows(ELLEN, SPRINGER), and celebrity news shows(ACCESS HOLLYWOOD). NBC is no longer interested in soaps. I'll eat crow, feathers and all if I'm wrong and bow to your holiness, but to see news like this and just assume "budget cuts," oy vey.
I dont know if you have some inside info or are just assuming like everyone else, but this is exactly what Im saying. I have no doubt if NBC was sure it makes more sense financially to replace DAYS with some gameshow or talkshow, or whatever else, they would do it.

But it didnt happen so far, NBC is keeping DAYS and even promoting it and resurrecting a huge fan event for its fans which was already canceled. If the replacements were so viable and profitable as you believe DAYS would be replaced long time ago, and not just DAYS but all soaps (except Y/R and B/B) on all networks because the numbers are +- the same.

Besides ratings are falling across the board, its not just soaps. And I think there was even an article not so long ago claiming even in the current tough times daytime soaps are still the safest way to reach those desired 18-34 and 18-49 women. Of course, when there is a big local news to report it makes sense for the affiliates to reschedule, because more people is interested in the news than soap. But is there that kind of news every day, 260times per year?

As Im saying Im no insider and I have no idea what kind of talks are going/or went between NBC/Corday and Sony, so maybe Im terribly wrong and the show will be gone next year. But looking from outside Im actually feeling more positive than the last negotiation.
I agree, Jane.

If Days were cancelled, it would've been done by now. I think the extent of the budget cuts is what is keeping this deal from being done.

Sorry but hiring two new actors, re-signing current ones, bringing back a fan event, increasing promotion, and releasing a ratings press release for the first time in at least over a year to hype the show's highest demo numbers in over a year does not equal being cancelled. A show would be tying up loose ends and beginning the process of ending things. It's nearly November and the show would be leaving the air in March if canceled. Word would've leaked by now. You would be able to tell with some of the actors what was going on. A few months ago, I could buy the whole "It's canceled but NBC is hiding it" theory because cast members were barely talking and the show was a mess behind the scenes. I can't buy that now. Things have straightened out and NBC has to be happy with it in some capacity. Otherwise, why all the promotion? Why the fan event? Why a press release that hypes the show's accomplishment in demos? It doesn't make sense to do all that, among other things, if a show is already canceled.

The show is still making money and what goes forgotten is the fact that NBC seems committed to demos now and not so much HH numbers. Having said that, a 1.9 HH rating means more then it would've years ago. The value is different. Not clear on the details but I do know it's been discussed that a 1.9 ratings a few years ago would equal something higher.

I so agree with Rakesh that Corday and Sony would probably find another network. However, it seems like some in this thread are hinting at knowing something. If you do, post it. Otherwise, given the seriousness of this, I wouldn't hint at anything and just leave it alone. I mean, the DR posted a few weeks ago the show was renewed and I very much doubt they would post something like that if they didn't have enough reason to believe it. If things were going bad for Days, there is enough media outlets out there that something would be hinted at or leaked out. This is Days we are talking about. Everything leaks.
It could be that NBC & Days are doing all of this promotion as a last ditch attempt to see if they can bring the numbers up at all. I cannot believe that in the board room ANYONE is happy about Days numbers regardless of what their press releases say. For me it sounds like the clip I just heard from John McCain about how good his campaign is doing.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Rakesh198
Member Avatar


When i heard about the Days event, I took that as a farewell to fans. I hope I'm wrong.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Rakesh198
Member Avatar


TV networks seek franchise fix
Revivals of 'Five-0', 'Partridge Family' planned
By MICHAEL SCHNEIDER

The feature world's franchise fever has spread -- and is now infecting TV.

Broadcasters continue to raid network and studio vaults in search of old favorites to dust off. For starters, NBC is plotting a modern-day "The Partridge Family," while CBS is looking at reviving "Hawaii Five-O" and "The Streets of San Francisco."

More recently, the CW turned to one of Warner Bros.' top brands -- Batman -- and came up with "The Graysons," a look at the Caped Crusader's sidekick before he became known as Robin. NBC is deep into mythology, with "Crusoe" just launching and "Jason and the Argonauts" on the way. And over at ABC, the net is looking at a new spin on the early-'80s sci-fi miniseries "V."

"Part of this is market driven," says CBS Paramount Network TV prexy David Stapf, whose studio has been looking at several remakes. "There are so many choices for viewers right now that we've really got to zero in on how to get people's attention."

Indeed, as the network ratings continue to erode, it becomes even tougher to market new shows -- particularly in the summertime, when circulation is at an all-time low.

A show like this fall's "90210," on the other hand, entered the fall with more buzz than any other new series, thanks to the built-in interest from fans of the original.

"The CW has a marketing challenge with all of its shows," Stapf notes. "They're ahead of the game by bringing in something that's already familiar to their viewership, whether in title or tone."

Indeed, the "90210" brand name put the new series on top of the charts that measured awareness of new TV entries among viewers. "90210" was neck-and-neck with another familiar title from the past NBC's remake of "Knight Rider."

In the case of "90210," that familiarity came with a double-edged sword. People were more interested in talking about the show's 1990s cast than its new incarnation. At the same time, a big chunk of CW's viewership were too young to watch the original, and only knew it from flipping past repeats on cable, if at all.

But Stapf's studio is buoyed by the early returns for "90210," which is holding its own on. "Knight Rider," on the other hand, launched last spring with a highly-rated TV movie, but as a series has not sped up the Nielsen charts just yet.

That perhaps proves another dictum: People may return for nostalgia's sake to see how a favorite franchise has been updated, much like an opening weekend at the box office. But if viewers don't like what they see, or perhaps weren't anxious to see how their one-time favorite has evolved, then they're out.

That's why the jury's still out on remakes of shows that have been off the year for more than a decade. "Hawaii 5-O" doesn't come with the same baggage that "90210" did (there's no chance Jack Lord can make a return appearance and steal the spotlight, after all), but that may not be a good thing. Too many years have passed since the original went off the air in 1980 -- which means viewers under 40 might not care.

Stapf says he was nonetheless drawn to some nostalgia -- "it's got that great theme song," he notes -- and the fact that it's a more sunny, idealistic cop drama in an age when police procedurals are uniformly dark and gritty.

Ditto "Streets of San Francisco," although that one may be even less familiar with viewers.

The nostalgia factor also plays into the return of "V." The original 1983 miniseries probably wouldn't hold up to 2008 standards in terms of production quality, but that doesn't matter to the millions of viewers who still remember being glued to the TV screen when the lizards tried to take over the earth.

"Whenever I mention 'V' to anybody, they still have a lot of good memories about the original movie and series," says scribe Scott Peters. "It's a science fiction icon, and too good to pass up."

"V" will share the original's name and basic idea, but the similarities will end there, Peters said.

That's akin to how Sci-Fi channel resurrected "Battlestar Galactica," which managed to score many more raves than the 1970s edition ever did, partly because it advanced and enhanced the original's conceit.

With all these rehashed concepts and modern spins on old favorites, TV is only catching up with what the feature world has been doing for years.

Not only have classic TV shows been remade into movies -- frequently with tongue-in-cheek -- but this summer saw two more TV franchises revived on the big screen, "Sex and the City" and "The X-Files."

What's more, comicbook franchises, from Superman and Batman to the Incredible Hulk and Iron Man, dominate the screen.

At CW, the network has taken its "Smallville" formula -- take Superman's pre-superhero, awkward teenage years, and turn it into a TV show -- and is now applying it to "The Graysons," about, yes, Robin (of Batman fame) and his pre-superhero, awkward teenage years.

NBC, meanwhile, hopes viewers will be interested in new takes on the age-old stories of "Crusoe" and "Merlin."

Of course, not every TV show or dusty franchise is screaming for a revival. ABC's "Fantasy Island" redux failed without Ricardo Montalban and Herve Villechaize. Ditto UPN's Captain Stubing-less "The Love Boat." CBS' "The Fugitive" didn't capture viewers, who perhaps had already gotten their nostalgia fix via the Harrison Ford film a few years earlier. And viewers saw through ABC's attempt at creating a Dick Wolf franchise with "L.A. Dragnet," which perhaps should have been titled "L.A. and Order" instead.

Last year, NBC's "Bionic Woman" also quickly dropped from view, once viewers decided they didn't care much for the new incarnation.

In comedy, the nets have taken several shots at remaking "The Odd Couple" -- even producing one version with an African American cast.

With so many failed revivals in the annals of primetime history, no one wants to become the network that just remakes old shows and resurrects popular franchises -- and Stapf warns against that kind of nostalgia saturation.

"It's far more important to get '90210' right," he says. "You want genuine success before rushing into a 'Melrose Place' or whatever else down the line."

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117994258.html?categoryid=14&cs=1
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
FanODays


Rakesh198
Oct 19 2008, 01:46 PM
TV networks seek franchise fix
Revivals of 'Five-0', 'Partridge Family' planned
By MICHAEL SCHNEIDER

The feature world's franchise fever has spread -- and is now infecting TV.

Broadcasters continue to raid network and studio vaults in search of old favorites to dust off. For starters, NBC is plotting a modern-day "The Partridge Family," while CBS is looking at reviving "Hawaii Five-O" and "The Streets of San Francisco."

More recently, the CW turned to one of Warner Bros.' top brands -- Batman -- and came up with "The Graysons," a look at the Caped Crusader's sidekick before he became known as Robin. NBC is deep into mythology, with "Crusoe" just launching and "Jason and the Argonauts" on the way. And over at ABC, the net is looking at a new spin on the early-'80s sci-fi miniseries "V."

"Part of this is market driven," says CBS Paramount Network TV prexy David Stapf, whose studio has been looking at several remakes. "There are so many choices for viewers right now that we've really got to zero in on how to get people's attention."

Indeed, as the network ratings continue to erode, it becomes even tougher to market new shows -- particularly in the summertime, when circulation is at an all-time low.

A show like this fall's "90210," on the other hand, entered the fall with more buzz than any other new series, thanks to the built-in interest from fans of the original.

"The CW has a marketing challenge with all of its shows," Stapf notes. "They're ahead of the game by bringing in something that's already familiar to their viewership, whether in title or tone."

Indeed, the "90210" brand name put the new series on top of the charts that measured awareness of new TV entries among viewers. "90210" was neck-and-neck with another familiar title from the past NBC's remake of "Knight Rider."

In the case of "90210," that familiarity came with a double-edged sword. People were more interested in talking about the show's 1990s cast than its new incarnation. At the same time, a big chunk of CW's viewership were too young to watch the original, and only knew it from flipping past repeats on cable, if at all.

But Stapf's studio is buoyed by the early returns for "90210," which is holding its own on. "Knight Rider," on the other hand, launched last spring with a highly-rated TV movie, but as a series has not sped up the Nielsen charts just yet.

That perhaps proves another dictum: People may return for nostalgia's sake to see how a favorite franchise has been updated, much like an opening weekend at the box office. But if viewers don't like what they see, or perhaps weren't anxious to see how their one-time favorite has evolved, then they're out.

That's why the jury's still out on remakes of shows that have been off the year for more than a decade. "Hawaii 5-O" doesn't come with the same baggage that "90210" did (there's no chance Jack Lord can make a return appearance and steal the spotlight, after all), but that may not be a good thing. Too many years have passed since the original went off the air in 1980 -- which means viewers under 40 might not care.

Stapf says he was nonetheless drawn to some nostalgia -- "it's got that great theme song," he notes -- and the fact that it's a more sunny, idealistic cop drama in an age when police procedurals are uniformly dark and gritty.

Ditto "Streets of San Francisco," although that one may be even less familiar with viewers.

The nostalgia factor also plays into the return of "V." The original 1983 miniseries probably wouldn't hold up to 2008 standards in terms of production quality, but that doesn't matter to the millions of viewers who still remember being glued to the TV screen when the lizards tried to take over the earth.

"Whenever I mention 'V' to anybody, they still have a lot of good memories about the original movie and series," says scribe Scott Peters. "It's a science fiction icon, and too good to pass up."

"V" will share the original's name and basic idea, but the similarities will end there, Peters said.

That's akin to how Sci-Fi channel resurrected "Battlestar Galactica," which managed to score many more raves than the 1970s edition ever did, partly because it advanced and enhanced the original's conceit.

With all these rehashed concepts and modern spins on old favorites, TV is only catching up with what the feature world has been doing for years.

Not only have classic TV shows been remade into movies -- frequently with tongue-in-cheek -- but this summer saw two more TV franchises revived on the big screen, "Sex and the City" and "The X-Files."

What's more, comicbook franchises, from Superman and Batman to the Incredible Hulk and Iron Man, dominate the screen.

At CW, the network has taken its "Smallville" formula -- take Superman's pre-superhero, awkward teenage years, and turn it into a TV show -- and is now applying it to "The Graysons," about, yes, Robin (of Batman fame) and his pre-superhero, awkward teenage years.

NBC, meanwhile, hopes viewers will be interested in new takes on the age-old stories of "Crusoe" and "Merlin."

Of course, not every TV show or dusty franchise is screaming for a revival. ABC's "Fantasy Island" redux failed without Ricardo Montalban and Herve Villechaize. Ditto UPN's Captain Stubing-less "The Love Boat." CBS' "The Fugitive" didn't capture viewers, who perhaps had already gotten their nostalgia fix via the Harrison Ford film a few years earlier. And viewers saw through ABC's attempt at creating a Dick Wolf franchise with "L.A. Dragnet," which perhaps should have been titled "L.A. and Order" instead.

Last year, NBC's "Bionic Woman" also quickly dropped from view, once viewers decided they didn't care much for the new incarnation.

In comedy, the nets have taken several shots at remaking "The Odd Couple" -- even producing one version with an African American cast.

With so many failed revivals in the annals of primetime history, no one wants to become the network that just remakes old shows and resurrects popular franchises -- and Stapf warns against that kind of nostalgia saturation.

"It's far more important to get '90210' right," he says. "You want genuine success before rushing into a 'Melrose Place' or whatever else down the line."

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117994258.html?categoryid=14&cs=1
Remaking old shows is a cop out unless they do like Battlestar did because that show is not really a remake but rather a continuation of the old show plus other than Mad Men, its the best written show on TV.

Going back to what someone said about Days not making a dent in the $500 million, well it depends on how you look at it. NBC may be able to make more money showing reruns of a show they already own than what they make off Days. Remember whatever money Days makes is split between Corday, Sony and NBC.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
mesagirl
Member Avatar


I wonder if we are headed back to more game shows and reality shows? They are much cheaper to produce.

I guess I am not all that surprised that this is happening. The Wall Street mess will definitely affect all aspects of our society, including the entertainment industry. That coupled with having so many more choices in how we spend our down time in the evenings, I can see TV starting to take a back seat. I play RPG games on my Xbox 360 in the evening quite a bit, Netflix makes it easier to see movies (can watch them right on your puter too), and of course the computer itself, I think World of Warcraft has changed the way a lot of people spend their time... TV is not the media giant it once was.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
PhoenixRising05
Member Avatar
GET EM STEPH!!

FanODays
Oct 19 2008, 01:39 PM
PhoenixRising05
Oct 19 2008, 12:56 PM
jane1978
Oct 19 2008, 08:11 AM
IHeartDRRick
Oct 19 2008, 07:04 AM
Unprofitable for big affiliates who could make more money with syndicated programming or an additional news hour? Absolutely, without a doubt, 1000%. Daytime is no longer a network issue. It's all about the affiliates and if they are not making money, they want control and NBC has allowed its affiliates to trample over their daytime lineup for years. When you've got the #2 soap in America airing in late night TV for an hourlong afternoon newscast, you finally realize that very little is safe or sacred where the daytime lineup is concerned.

And what little money DAYS makes for NBC isn't going to come close to recouping a $500 Million Dollar loss. NBC's daypart efforts are better suited in the market of syndication, where they own cheaper properties like Game Shows(DEAL OR NO DEAL), talk shows(ELLEN, SPRINGER), and celebrity news shows(ACCESS HOLLYWOOD). NBC is no longer interested in soaps. I'll eat crow, feathers and all if I'm wrong and bow to your holiness, but to see news like this and just assume "budget cuts," oy vey.
I dont know if you have some inside info or are just assuming like everyone else, but this is exactly what Im saying. I have no doubt if NBC was sure it makes more sense financially to replace DAYS with some gameshow or talkshow, or whatever else, they would do it.

But it didnt happen so far, NBC is keeping DAYS and even promoting it and resurrecting a huge fan event for its fans which was already canceled. If the replacements were so viable and profitable as you believe DAYS would be replaced long time ago, and not just DAYS but all soaps (except Y/R and B/B) on all networks because the numbers are +- the same.

Besides ratings are falling across the board, its not just soaps. And I think there was even an article not so long ago claiming even in the current tough times daytime soaps are still the safest way to reach those desired 18-34 and 18-49 women. Of course, when there is a big local news to report it makes sense for the affiliates to reschedule, because more people is interested in the news than soap. But is there that kind of news every day, 260times per year?

As Im saying Im no insider and I have no idea what kind of talks are going/or went between NBC/Corday and Sony, so maybe Im terribly wrong and the show will be gone next year. But looking from outside Im actually feeling more positive than the last negotiation.
I agree, Jane.

If Days were cancelled, it would've been done by now. I think the extent of the budget cuts is what is keeping this deal from being done.

Sorry but hiring two new actors, re-signing current ones, bringing back a fan event, increasing promotion, and releasing a ratings press release for the first time in at least over a year to hype the show's highest demo numbers in over a year does not equal being cancelled. A show would be tying up loose ends and beginning the process of ending things. It's nearly November and the show would be leaving the air in March if canceled. Word would've leaked by now. You would be able to tell with some of the actors what was going on. A few months ago, I could buy the whole "It's canceled but NBC is hiding it" theory because cast members were barely talking and the show was a mess behind the scenes. I can't buy that now. Things have straightened out and NBC has to be happy with it in some capacity. Otherwise, why all the promotion? Why the fan event? Why a press release that hypes the show's accomplishment in demos? It doesn't make sense to do all that, among other things, if a show is already canceled.

The show is still making money and what goes forgotten is the fact that NBC seems committed to demos now and not so much HH numbers. Having said that, a 1.9 HH rating means more then it would've years ago. The value is different. Not clear on the details but I do know it's been discussed that a 1.9 ratings a few years ago would equal something higher.

I so agree with Rakesh that Corday and Sony would probably find another network. However, it seems like some in this thread are hinting at knowing something. If you do, post it. Otherwise, given the seriousness of this, I wouldn't hint at anything and just leave it alone. I mean, the DR posted a few weeks ago the show was renewed and I very much doubt they would post something like that if they didn't have enough reason to believe it. If things were going bad for Days, there is enough media outlets out there that something would be hinted at or leaked out. This is Days we are talking about. Everything leaks.
It could be that NBC & Days are doing all of this promotion as a last ditch attempt to see if they can bring the numbers up at all. I cannot believe that in the board room ANYONE is happy about Days numbers regardless of what their press releases say. For me it sounds like the clip I just heard from John McCain about how good his campaign is doing.
Then why put out a press release? They haven't done that in at least over a year and yet they do last week when Days is only a point above in pretty much both coveted demos?

Again, you don't put out a release like that for a canceled show. Why hype something your getting rid of? Why promote something heavily you are getting rid of? I also can't buy the fanfest as a goodbye to fans. They would classify it as such. The actors would not feel right doing something like that and not telling the audience it's a goodbye.

Plus, you don't hire two news actors, bring in a new EP and make changes to the writing team if your going off in March. Regardless of any source or whoever says what, all these signs make no sense to be associated with a canceled show.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
River


Days has probably been renewed. Otherwise, actors would already be lining up other jobs and local affiliates would already be shopping around for replacement programming come March. I assume money is the sticking point that has kept the deal from being finalized. Tomlin is probably arguing that he should be given a few months to get the demos up again before NBC decides on a final dollar amount. Considering the anarchy that was going on backstage for much of the summer, this is a reasonable request. Of course, I would appreciate NBC demanding a more reputable headwriter as a condition for renewal.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
PhoenixRising05
Member Avatar
GET EM STEPH!!

River
Oct 19 2008, 02:39 PM
Days has probably been renewed. Otherwise, actors would already be lining up other jobs and local affiliates would already be shopping around for replacement programming come March. I assume money is the sticking point that has kept the deal from being finalized. Tomlin is probably arguing that he should be given a few months to get the demos up again before NBC decides on a final dollar amount. Considering the anarchy that was going on backstage for much of the summer, this is a reasonable request. Of course, I would appreciate NBC demanding a more reputable headwriter as a condition for renewal.
Good post.

That could be it too. I mean, it's pretty known now that Nadia Bjorlin was axed and it did look like Bryan Dattilo's days or some other vets were done yet they are both still here and involved and we hear nothing of more cast cuts at the moment. It seems to me something derailed Days' cut plans. Maybe Corday and co were hesitant and asked for more time to improve the situation.

Also, the last time Corday spoke to the press in August when the news broke about Tomlin, he was very confident. Hell, he felt optimistic about the show remaining on air for 4 years, let alone 2. I know he has to be optimistic but if your show is about to be canceled, you want to hint to fans things are bad so they can campaign and write in. Not only that but the Days actors would've been taking action by now. They would be posting on their sites in an effort to get fans to save the show. They would be looking for work. Peggy McKay and Suzanne Rogers just did a photo shoot. I mean, things are still happening. Higley had an article in People magazine about the autism story and how an NBC EXEC pushed for the story to be done after hearing about her son being autistic.

There is just too many signs that work against the notion of cancellation. I'm not saying NBC is 100% happy with the show. They are probably upset with most of their own network because it's in the gutter. However, if they were going to cancel Days, we would know by now. The mags would've picked up on something. Hell, someone would've. It's been going on for too long not to and if things were going bad, the show or it's cast would leak it wanting all the fan support they can to help their case.
Edited by PhoenixRising05, Oct 19 2008, 02:48 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Mason
Member Avatar


I'm holding out hope that the official announcement is being held up so a new Head Writer can be announced along with it. But I'm sure that's just a pipe dream.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
bellcurve
Member Avatar


King
Oct 19 2008, 10:57 AM
Someone said recently that in a few years, we might be down a network or two.

My guess is CW will fall first, and NBC will fall next, maybe within the next ten years.

Times they are a changin'.
I think NBC will give an hour to the affiliates first, before they fold altogether.

Quote:
 
Then why put out a press release? They haven't done that in at least over a year and yet they do last week when Days is only a point above in pretty much both coveted demos?

Again, you don't put out a release like that for a canceled show. Why hype something your getting rid of? Why promote something heavily you are getting rid of? I also can't buy the fanfest as a goodbye to fans. They would classify it as such. The actors would not feel right doing something like that and not telling the audience it's a goodbye.


Because the actors and the affiliates haven't been told yet, for whatever reason. Maybe Corday assumes that the show will get a renewal, who knows. But there are SO many things working against a renewal right now, and this article regarding NBC's $500Million deficit proves it.

And if the show has been renewed, why not issue an official press release? I mean, do you honestly believe that they've been "talking about the money" for the past few months?

Quote:
 
Plus, you don't hire two news actors, bring in a new EP and make changes to the writing team if your going off in March. Regardless of any source or whoever says what, all these signs make no sense to be associated with a canceled show.


As far as the new EP, everyone had s figured out that was mandated. It was either replace Ed Scott or face the WGA. There wasn't much of a choice there.

As far as hiring new actors to play roles, Sean Kanan was hired for SUNSET BEACH about two months before that show got its walking papers. The cast of PORT CHARLES got an Emmy Nomination and that still didn't save them. And if you're gonna throw out the "well, everyone's ratings are down" excuse, CBS canceled soaps SEARCH FOR TOMORROW and CAPITOL when they were performing at decent numbers, numbers higher than every soap on the NBC Network at times.

The reality of the situation is that no one is talking at DAYS. The behind the scenes people aren't talking, NBC isn't talking. No one has officially said DAYS is renewed. Aside from that small bite where Scott said, "It's always about the money," where else have we heard about talks for DAYS?

As I said before, I'm not trying to rain on anyone's parade, but the deck is stacked against the show right now.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Cupcake06


As a Passions fan, this is interesting because it reminds me so much of the speculation that took place back in 06 regarding the renewal/cancellation of that show. The renewal announcement was taking forever to come, so everyone began to worry it was cancelled. An announcement eventually came, but it was like...5 months late, and with extensive budget cuts. Less than a year later, there was discussion of a Today show expansion and so once again people began to speculate that Passions was in danger. There were those that just knew it was done, and there were others, myself included, that thought it wouldn't make sense for a show to do different promotions, hire new actors, and brag about demos if they had already been cancelled. But that was the case. I know that Days and Passions are two different shows and every situation is different, but with NBC you just never know. And that is the sucky part about being a fan of a soap that airs on their network.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
jane1978


IHeartDRRick
Oct 19 2008, 04:28 PM
Because the actors and the affiliates haven't been told yet, for whatever reason. Maybe Corday assumes that the show will get a renewal, who knows. But there are SO many things working against a renewal right now, and this article regarding NBC's $500Million deficit proves it.

And if the show has been renewed, why not issue an official press release? I mean, do you honestly believe that they've been "talking about the money" for the past few months?
I dont think they are talking about the money. I think they are holding up the deal, Corday asking for something and NBC offering less and Corday hoping Tomlin will be able to rise the demos thus the cuts will not be so deep.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
ZetaBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Free Forums with no limits on posts or members.
Learn More · Sign-up Now
Go to Next Page
« Previous Topic · DAYS: News, Spoilers & Discussion · Next Topic »
Add Reply