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The Edge of Night Discussion
Topic Started: Dec 16 2009, 04:45 PM (2,908 Views)
RutherfordBHayes


I am so glad you enjoyed my article. It was a dream come true for me to see the infamous Tower - The Whitney Family Summer Estate.
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RutherfordBHayes


I have some news. Anyone who knows me that the only thing that equals my passion for 'The Edge of Night,' is my passion for Presidential History and politics. Well, would you believe I have come across something that combines the two? I feel like a kid on Christmas morning.
I have discovered that the late actress Jane White, who played Nurse Lydia Holliday (1968), has a very unique lineage. She is a great-great-great grandfather of a signer of the Declaration of Independence Benjamin Harrison V, she is the great-great granddaughter of President William Henry Harrison and is the daughter of Walter White, who headed the NAACP president from 1931-1955.
Jane White appeared on Broadway with Carol Burnett in 'Once Upon a Mattress.'
As Nurse Holliday, she conspired with male nurse's aide Calvin Brenner (Scott Glenn) to kill their patient Phil Capice (Ray MacDonnell).
Old Tippecanoe, in addition to having 10 children by his wife Anna Tuthill Symmes, also had 6 children with his slave Dilsia. Prior to his presidential campaign, in 1836, William Henry Harrison, saw fit to hide his dirt under the rug by selling his slave to his brother. WHH ultimately lost the 1836 election, but won in a landslide in 1840. As our History books will tell you, the then oldest man to assume the presidency (age 68) gave the longest Inaugural Address (1 Hour, 45 minutes) in a cold, rain drenched Washington, DC without his hat or overcoat. One month later, President Harrison died of pneumonia, becoming the first incumbent Chief Executive to die in office.
In her Summer 2011 NYT obit, the 89 year old White was quoted as saying that she would have had a more substanive stage career had she not been too Black for White parts and too White for Black parts.
I have already spoken to the library archivist of Miss White's alma mater, Smith College (where she donated her papers).
Since 1968 was such a horrible year for us historically (the MLK and RFK assassinations), I have been wondering if Jane shared her unique lineage to her castmates. I have been unsuccessful in contacting Scott Glenn and I have written two letters to Ray MacDonnell, both at the AMC re-boot studio in Connecticut as well as his suburban New York home. I have not heard from him.
I'm hoping to get enough information to do either a research paper or book.
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RutherfordBHayes


In other Edge news, I had the delightful experience of having a front row seat to Holland Taylor's one woman show 'Ann' (the late Texas Governor Ann Richards).
Like Jane White a decade earlier, Taylor played a devious RN on Edge in 1978.
Primetime audiences know her from her long running stint as Evelyn Harper on CBS' 'Two and a Half Men.'
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jdcon61


THE EDGE OF NIGHT
FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1973

Synopsis written by Jim C.

Scene 1:

It’s afternoon in the Hillyer living room; Adam Drake and Jim and Liz Fields are waiting for Elly Jo. Liz tells her she’s ready to leave whenever she (Elly Jo) is; EJ says she needs to get her other suitcase and still has to say goodbye to Orin. When she turns and goes upstairs Liz breathes a sigh of relief; she, Adam and Jim wait tensely until she’s out of earshot.

“That wasn’t too hard…” says Liz.
“No, the hard part comes later,” Jim grimly replies.

Adam says that Elly Jo won’t be upstairs for long and they need to get a head start. He suggests they take Jim’s car and get to the rest area. Jim agrees and goes to Liz, “You’re sure you want to go through with this honey?” Liz nods and tells him she knows everything’s going to be all right. Jim reminds her to not take any chances as she’s taking them for two now.

Adam tells Liz to keep a cool head and to keep on driving, no matter what Elly Jo says. Jim kisses her and follows Adam out…

Meanwhile John is serving Orin tea in his bedroom. When he asks him if the tea is hot enough Orin replies, “Yes, John, it’s fine…only please tell Trudy to stop making such delicious pastries…I’ll be too heavy to get out of this chair.”

There’s a light knock on the door and Elly Jo enters with her suitcase. John asks Orin if he needs anything else and after a glance at EJ’s suitcase asks her if she’s leaving. She replies flatly, “That’s right, John, I’m leaving. You tell Trudy that, I’m sure she’ll be so happy she’ll give you a great big kiss…”

Reacting to her sarcasm Orin says, “Really Elly Jo…” and she sweetly replies that she meant there would be one less bed to make every day. As he’s leaving John remarks, “it’s been ‘instructive’ knowing you,” to which EJ says, “You’ll see me again John, don’t worry.”

Elly Jo turns to Orin with tears in her eyes, “Oh, Orin…do you think it’s true? Will I ever see this house again? Ever?” She puts her suitcase down and rushes to him sobbing, he embraces her…

OPENING BILLBOARD
FIRST COMMERCIAL

Scene 2:

Trying to reassure her, Orin says, “of course you’re coming back to this house… often, and as an honored guest…” She tells him he’s always made her feel like a guest but he wryly replies, “No Elly Jo, I haven’t really been your host. I’ve been more like your burden…” she refutes this, telling him he’s wonderful and could never be a burden to anyone.

Orin reiterates that she mustn’t think she’s leaving for good; she’s still a part of the family and always will be. She’s going to stop being a paid companion to a crotchety invalid and will become a loving relative instead …well, hopefully not to an invalid anymore but there’s no guarantee he won’t be crotchety.

Elly Jo pleads with him to stop saying things like that, he’s the sweetest, kindest, most wonderful human being who’s ever walked the earth…Orin smiles saying, “I’ve done very little walking lately…but I’ll start again.”

“I know you will,” she says, “you’re going to be just fine! You’re going to rise up out of that old wheelchair and walk right down those stairs and be like your old self…” Orin remarks that she never knew his old self and EJ says, “all I know is you did more for me than anyone else in the world. I’ll never forget what you did Orin, never…” Orin tells her she’ll never be abandoned and if she needs anything, they’ll be there.

Elly Jo says she’s not going to be a burden, she’ll get herself a place to live and a decent job…she’ll be just fine. Orin asks if she has a place to live yet and she says her baby brother has a place for her; she’s going there now and Mrs. Fields is driving her. When she says goodbye, Orin says, “not goodbye, Elly Jo. Just so long, for now…” She kisses him saying, “I just want to tell you that knowing you was the best thing that ever happened to me.”

Laughing, Orin asks her to stop talking about him in the past tense. As she bends over to hug him her eyes show that she is thinking of him in the past tense!

John is straightening things up in the living room. He turns and spots the brandy bottle sitting on the sideboard. He goes to it, picks it up, looks at the label and then puts it into the cupboard…

In the car Jim tells Adam he’s not completely sold on the idea that Elly Jo was in cahoots with Simon Jessup to get the Hillyer millions. Adam says he thinks Jessup had his eye on it all along, and when he learned that Orin had included Elly Jo in his will as a succeeding heir…he tried to make her the only heir. When Jim says he chose a pretty bizarre scheme, Adam grimly responds that if it had worked no one would have known it was bizarre – or a scheme. All they would know is that Liz had a tragic accident at that curve in the road.

Jim admits he’s right but is very nervous for Liz’s sake, “I know I expunged that hallucination from her mind…but if Elly Jo thinks Liz is going to panic…I don’t know Adam, I just hope Liz can keep control of things…” Adam puts his hand to his aching forehead and suggests they pull over to the side of the road and wait.

SECOND COMMERCIAL

Scene 3:

Angela is typing in Adam’s office as Nicole enters. “Oh, Nicole…is Adam with you?” she asks. When Nicole tells her no, she asks her if she knows if he’s coming back that afternoon.

Taking a folded piece of paper out of her purse Nicole says, “I don’t really think he is, but he gave me this to give you – some notes on things he wants done, I suppose – it looks like a terrible scrawl to me, but maybe you can figure it out…” She goes on to say that when she had Angela’s job she had an awful time with Adam’s handwriting, “I told him that he should have been a doctor, not a lawyer. One of those doctors who write those indecipherable prescriptions…”

Squinting at the note Angela admits his handwriting is rather exotic but usually she can translate it. This one looks like he must have been in a hurry. Nicole says he probably was and asks how Adam seems to her, particularly his health. She (Nicole) thinks he was wrong to rush back to work so soon after the accident – especially with something so tricky as a concussion. Angela is in agreement saying he doesn’t work at the pace he used to but, of course, that would take some time. When Nicole asks her if he’s been complaining of headaches she says he has; and he’s just a bit more forgetful than he used to be, “in other words, he’s a little bit more like a normal person.”

Nicole asks her what she means by that and with a smile Angela says, “Surely you realize what a phenomenal memory Adam has? It’s quite incredible – he constantly remembers names, dates and places that any normal human being would have discarded from memory. I mean, details of trials and law suits that he handled years and years ago.”

Agreeing with her Nicole says, “Yes, I suppose Adam is that way.” Angela remarks that he’s not so good at the memory game now…in fact, there are moments when he’s downright absent-minded. He’ll be dictating a letter and suddenly forget why he was writing in the first place. Nicole looks troubled at this and says lightly, “Well…as long as he doesn’t forget that he’s supposed to get married next week…that’s all I’m really concerned about…”

The phone rings and Angela picks up, “Mr. Drake’s office…Oh, hello, Orin.”


INTERCUT SCENES

Still in his bedroom Orin asks Angela how she’s doing. “Since you saw me this morning?” asks Angela, “still fine.”

Orin says he’s glad to hear it and asks if Adam has returned yet. Angela says he hasn’t and she doesn’t expect him for the rest of the afternoon; she asks him if there’s something she can do.

“No, it’s nothing important, I just wanted to consult with him on a tax matter. At least – that’s the excuse I just made up…”

Confused, Angela says, “Excuse?”

Orin says, “Not to talk to Adam, to talk to you. To hear your voice again, Angela.” Blushing, Angela looks up at Nicole, who realizes the conversation is getting intimate. (DISSOLVE:)

THIRD COMMERCIAL
BUMPER
FOURTH COMMERCIAL

Scene 4:

In Adam’s office, immediately after, Angela says into the phone, “Well, that’s very nice Orin, but I’m sure you’d much rather talk to Adam.”

As Nicole starts to excuse herself, Angela asks Orin to hold on for a second and covers the phone. Nicole says she’ll be running along…she can see that Angela’s getting busy. Smiling, Angela thanks her for delivering the notes and says she’s looking forward to her and Adam’s wedding. Nicole leaves the room and Angela says into the phone, “Orin, I’m sorry. Nicole was here – she just left.”

INTERCUT SCENES

Orin says, “I see. Well now, where was I?”

“You were saying pretty things about hearing my voice again,” she says. “But that won’t accomplish the business purpose of this call…assuming there was a purpose.”

Orin says, “Yes…you’re quite right. There was a purpose…I was just sitting here and thinking about things…about the past and the present…I suppose it was Elly Jo’s fault. She just came to say goodbye, Angela. She’s left, you know…for good…she made it sound very much more final than necessary…”

Angela is pleased with this but isn’t about to show it. She says, “Well, some visits do have to come to an end, Orin.”

He replies, “Yes…I suppose I know that we can’t hold on to people forever. People are like rivers that sometimes flow into one another and then…go their separate ways. But for some reason, it affected my mood…maybe because of Elly Jo’s connection with her aunt…with poor Julie…”

Angela says it’s understandable that he’d feel that way and Orin responds that when Elly Jo left his room his thoughts were of her (Angela). Even though it’s only been an hour or two since he saw her he can’t get the image of her face out of his mind. He apologizes saying this is hardly the sort of conversation to hold over the phone to which Angela responds, “Just the same…don’t stop.”

Orin tells her he feels like he should have said more to her…he should have said that…he loves her! Maybe he needed the telephone, an electronic mask, before he could say what he felt, that he loves her and nothing in the world could mean more to him than to hear words like that from her. After a beat Angela says she didn’t think he needed the words from her, that he’d already guessed them…”I love you too! I love you very much.”

Meanwhile, Jim and Adam are in Jim’s parked car at the rest area; he wonders aloud how long it’s going to be…Adam says, “it all depends on how long Elly Jo takes to say goodbye to Orin…”

Shaking his head Jim says, “it’s incredible, isn’t it? When I think of how things have changed…since the first day we brought Elly Jo into that house…how antagonistic Orin was towards her…” Adam says EJ did remind Orin of his dead wife and that was the key to the whole relationship. Jim agrees saying, “I suppose it was. In fact, there was a time when Liz was afraid that Orin would marry Elly Jo.”

Growing increasingly nervous Jim asks, “Why doesn’t that car come?” When Adam tells him to relax Jim gets a little riled up saying, “Look fella, you’re the one who thought up this notion – don’t expect me to be relaxed about it…”

Jim asks if he thinks there’s any real danger to Liz and Adam says, “No – no great danger. I think the danger to Liz ended the minute that Orin altered his last will and testament. But on the other hand…maybe Orin’s danger began at the same time.”

Surprised Jim asks, “What danger?” Adam says, “Elly Jo can’t get the Hillyer millions any more. But she’s still down for twenty grand, and nothing has to happen to Liz for her to collect; only Orin.”

We finally see Liz driving while Elly Jo blathers on, “He was just so sweet about it Mrs. Fields, honestly, your father is just an angel.

Flatly, Liz replies, “Yes, he’s a good man. Sometimes he’s too good, too trusting.” EJ agrees with her saying that people take advantage of you if you’re too trusting. She goes so far as to say that she’s like that herself at times then says, “When a man is sick like Mr. Hillyer, why, he’s just more vulnerable.”

Liz says, “Yes…I’d say my father is vulnerable…but he isn’t really that sick any more. He’s getting much better.”

Elly Jo remarks that he looked sort of pale to her when Liz suddenly says, “Oh, my goodness! I just remembered! Dr. Lacey ordered some new medication, and I forgot to give it to him this afternoon!” EJ calmly says that’s nothing to worry about, she’ll just give it to him later.

Liz says, “No, he specifically told me to give it to Daddy after lunch, and I forgot!”

Elly Jo says, “Well, when you get to a phone, you can just call up John or Trudy and tell them to give him some…”

Liz tells her they won’t know where to find it. She then says that since EJ isn’t in a hurry to get to her brother’s place they can turn around. Alarmed, Elly Jo says, “You’re going to do what?”

Telling her they’re only four miles from home, Liz turns the wheel and says they’re going back…if she (Elly Jo) doesn’t mind. Elly Jo says, “Back? Back to Claybank?” She stares at Liz; unable to believe this is happening. (DISSOLVE :)

FIFTH COMMERCIAL

Scene 5:

Panicking Elly Jo says, “Mrs. Fields, this is silly! We can stop at that their rest area, just a little ways from here – they have a phone booth there…”

Liz says, “But I told you, Elly Jo, I don’t think I can describe this particular medicine to John or Trudy.” EJ tells her, “of course you can, and the name of the stuff must be on the label!”

Liz wryly says, “The truth is Elly Jo, I’ve forgotten the name of the medicine myself. You know how difficult these prescription names can be…”

Getting more and more hysterical as she watches the road Elly Jo says, “But what’s so important about your Daddy taking it? You said he’s getting better, he doesn’t need medicine…” Liz tells her that Dr. Lacey seemed to think it was important, that’s all she knows.

At the same time, at the rest area, Jim spots Liz’s car. “Adam, there it is!”
Adam tells him to go and stick as close as he can. He doesn’t need to worry about Elly Jo spotting them because she’ll be too busy watching the road. As Jim starts the engine we cut back to…

Inside Liz’s car Elly Jo is growing increasingly hysterical, “No, Mrs. Fields, no! I don’t want to go back there, I don’t want to!” When Liz asks her why, EJ tells her she’s already said her goodbye’s to Orin, John, Trudy and the house; it would break her heart to see everything again she sobs.

Liz says she’s being silly; she can “just wait in the car,” and Elly Jo pleads with her, “Please, please, please Mrs. Fields! Don’t ask me to do this, don’t! Stop the car and I’ll get out – I’ll hitch a ride to Monticello, I don’t mind…I don’t mind at all.” Again Liz tells her she’s being silly, she’s not going to let her out in the middle of the road, “Besides…there are some very dangerous curves around here – in fact, we’re not far from the place where I had my accident!”

With full realization Elly Jo says, “Oh, dear God almighty in heaven! Stop the car, Mrs. Fields, please! You can’t go to that place, you might – you might have another accident!”

Promising that nothing is going to happen Liz says, “Oh, I think I see the sign ahead…the one that says…three miles to Claybank.”

Elly Jo sees it too and goes into full-on panic mode, “You’re going to kill us! You’re going to see your Daddy in the road again, Mrs. Fields, don’t you know that?” Liz tells her she’s crazy and EJ screams, “No, no, Mr. Jessup makes you see it, he makes you see it so you’ll turn that wheel and crash, so that the car will go over that cliff…”

Liz says, “There’s the sign, Elly Jo.”

Freaking out Elly Jo says, “No! No” as she wrenches the car handle. Liz, suddenly alarmed, says, “Elly Jo – stop that, don’t!” But Elly Jo shouts, “I won’t stay here and get killed!”

Liz screams, “Elly Jo – no! We’re traveling too fast!” as Elly Jo flings herself from the car. (FADE OUT:)

SIXTH COMMERCIAL
END CREDITS
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RutherfordBHayes


I learned, the other day, of the passing of Louis Criscuolo (Danny Micelli) on Dec 13, 2014, at the age of 80.
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