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ATWT: 1/30/70 Script Transcription
Topic Started: Sep 5 2010, 05:50 PM (265 Views)
Matt
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Classic Soap Fan

I have a small handful of vintage soap scripts in my collection. One of my prized ones is this script for the Friday, January 30, 1970, episode of AS THE WORLD TURNS.

According to the cover sheet --

CAST:
Claire
Judge Lowell
Don
Tom
Ed (Prisoner)
Paul
Liz
Amanda
Bob
David
Miss Thompson

Agency: Young & Rubicam, Inc.
Writers: Irna Phillips, Warren Swanson, & John Boruff
Producer: Mary Harris
Associate Producer: Joe Rothenberger
Director: Cort Steen & Paul Lammers
Production Assistant: Diane Griffin
Costume Designer: Edythe Gilfond
Set Designer: Steven O. Saxe
Music Director: Charles Paul
Announcer: Dan McCullough
Make Up Artist: June Gosset

And now, for the next 30 minutes...




ACT I

CASSEN DEN. MORNING. AT OPENING, JUDGE LOWELL IS TALKING ON THE PHONE. HE HOLDS AN OPENED NEWSPAPER. CLAIRE, LOOKING VERY ANXIOUS, IS STANDING NEAR HIM.

JUDGE
(INTO PHONE) ...Oh? When did Mr. Hughes get my message? I see. Fine. Thank you. (HANGS UP, TURNS TO CLAIRE) Don left his apartment (hotel?) half an hour ago, he's on his way here.

CLAIRE
(INDICATES THE NEWSPAPER) Good. I hope he can tell us more about Tom and the murder than that confusing story in the newspaper.

JUDGE
I presume he can tell us a great deal more. He and Chris have been the attorneys on the case almost from the moment the boy was arrested. (LOOKS AT NEWSPAPER, SHAKES HIS HEAD) "Stepson Held for Doctor's Murder". Incredible, absolutely incredible.

CLAIRE
That someone decided to murder Michael Shea? No, Father Lowell, it isn't incredible at all. He was a cruel, hateful man. I'm surprised that someone didn't do it long before this.

JUDGE
Now, now, Claire, you're predjudiced -- you can't judge Michael Shea fairly.

CLAIRE
After the wretched experiences I went through with him, I -- yes, you're right, I can't judge him fairly. I feel nothing but contempt at the very mention of his name.

JUDGE
However, I did not mean that it is incredible that someone murdered him -- I meant that it is incredible that Tom Hughes is the one the police are convinced is the murderer.

CLAIRE
But he's not. Father Lowell. Nothing has been proven... the police only have suspicions.

JUDGE
Claire, I am one hundred percent behind Tom -- our law firm will conduct his defense to the utmost of our ability -- but we must be aware that those police suspicions are based on very solid evidence.

CLAIRE
Solid evidence?

JUDGE
(INDICATES PAPER AGAIN) Tom's record with drugs -- his incriminating confession letter -- the janitor's clear and precise description of the murderer. Yes, I'm afraid they have a most substantial case -- and we will have to put up the fight of our lives if we're going to get the boy cleared.

CLAIRE
(LOOKS AT WATCH, IMPATIENTLY) Where on earth is Don? Maybe he's found something that will make Tom's case look a little more hopeful.

JUDGE
While we're waiting, I could call Chris. He and Don have been working together on this.

CLAIRE
Oh, yes, Father Lowell, call him -- please. Maybe he -- no, wait -- you'd better not. He's sure to be home with Nancy -- and I can imagine how she must feel right now.

JUDGE
Why not call Lisa?

CLAIRE
She won't be home. I'm sure she and her mother are down at the police station to see Tom. They -- (THE DOORBELL RINGS, FROM THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE) Oh, there's Don. _____ (NAME OF MADE, IF ESTABLISHED) will let him in. Father Lowell, you said that Don has been working with his father on Tom's defense. Does that mean he's decided to come back into the firm?

JUDGE
No. Chris and Nancy have been trying to persuade him to do it, but he's just going to be with us on this one case -- and that's only because of his personal interest in his nephew. Then he'll go back to his own -- (BRING IN DON. HE IS WEARING A COAT AND CARRYING A BRIEF CASE)

CLAIRE
Good morning, Don.

JUDGE
Hello, Don.

DON
(REMOVING THE COAT, PLACING THE BRIEF CASE ON A TABLE) Morning, Claire -- Judge Lowell. Sorry it took me so long to get here -- I stopped by the County Jail to make sure Tom had everything he needed. (FROWNS) It was hardly the most cheerful way to start a day.

JUDGE
(SURPRISED) Tom is in the the County Jail? So soon?

DON
(NODDING) They moved him from Central Police Station first thing this morning. Along with nine other prisoners, in one of those ugly black trucks. It looked like a hearse.

CLAIRE
Oh, the poor boy. How was he?

DON
Quiet. Very quiet. (BEAT) On the outside. (BEAT) Inside, he's just scared to death.

JUDGE
A pity --

DON
I've known him all his life -- he couldn't hide it from me.

JUDGE
I suggest that we get started, counselor -- we have work to do. And we face a serious problem.

DON
A serious problem?

JUDGE
(INDICATING THE NEWSPAPER AND DON'S BRIEF CASE) The mass of evidence against Thomas Christopher Hughes.

DON
We have a far more serious problem than that.

JUDGE
Oh? What?

DON
(BEAT) Thomas Christopher Hughes himself.

(TAKE DON, MORE DEEPLY CONCERNED THAN WE HAVE SEEN HIM BEFORE. TAKE CLAIRE. TAKE JUDGE LOWELL. AND TAKE THEM OUT.)

MUSIC: BRIDGE




next up: ACT II
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Matt
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ACT II

CASSEN DEN. MORNING. A FEW SECONDS AFTER THE PRECEDING SCENE. DON IS CONTINUING HIS TALK WITH THE JUDGE AND CLAIRE.

DON
He simply refused to communicate. With any of us -- on any level.

CLAIRE
Not even with Bob?

DON
Especially not with Bob. He just sat there -- polite, well-mannered, pleasant -- like a polite, well-mannered pleasant tree trunk -- and wouldn't tell us a thing -- about what happened last night -- where he was -- what he was doing -- who might have seen him at the time of Shea's murder.

JUDGE
Didn't you explain to him that it's almost impossible for an attorney to set up a workable defense unless the accused parties are willing to cooperate?

DON
A dozen times. With absolutely no response -- except to say that what he did, he had to do in his own way. Bob was furious.

JUDGE
He had a right to be. The boy is facing a murder charge and he makes no effort to defend himself. Why, it's the most infuriating thing I ever heard of.

CLAIRE
Yes, it is frustrating. But it's so terribly pathetic, too. When someone has so little need for living that he doesn't even bother trying to survive. Oh, Tom -- that dear, sweet -- hopeless boy.

DON
(BRISKLY, OPENING HIS BRIEF CASE, PULLING OUT LEGAL BOOKS AND PAPERS) Well, it's our job to save his hide -- even if he doesn't want it saved. (SPREADING THE BOOKS AND PAPERS ON A TABLE) I pulled everything out of the law library I thought would help.

JUDGE
Good. Don. The boy is entitled to the best defense we can possibly give him.

CLAIRE
(STARTS TOWARD DOOR) I hear coffee sharpens the mind -- I'll go bring some.

TAKE HER OUT. TAKE DON AND THE JUDGE AS THEY START TO LOOK THROUGH THE BOOKS.

JUDGE
(PICKING UP A BOOK) -- The latest rulings on search and seizure. Do you think the police might have been a little over-anxious when they came into Tom's apartment?

DON
(MAKES A NOTE ON A PAD) I'll check on it. But with Lieutenant Robinson on the case, I'd bet that every letter of every law was observed down to the last semi-colon. He's the sort of fellow who reads the fine print.

JUDGE
What about this janitor -- in case he positively identifies the boy? Is there any new ways we can challenge the validity of that identification?

DON
I was up half the night trying to find an answer to that one.

JUDGE
And -- ?

DON
And - nothing. If the janitor picks him out of a legally assembled lineup, he's stuck. The identification is admissable evidence in court. Of course, we can always question the janitor's eyesight -- or his depth perception -- or his -- state of mind at the time.

JUDGE
None of those legal niceties is going to give us any real help, Don, you know that.

DON
I'm afraid I do. What we need most is what we just can't get: the right words from Tom Hughes.

TAKE HIS DEFEATED EXPRESSIONS,
DISSOLVE TO:
TOM'S JAIL CELL. MORNING. TOM SITS ALONE, HUNCHED FORLORNLY IN A CORNER.

ED'S VOICE
(CALLING FROM THE ADJOINING CELL) Hey! (TOM DOESN'T REACT) Hey, you -- in number 27. (STILL NO REACTION) Hey!

TOM
(FINALLY NOTICES, SITS UP) Me?

ED'S VOICE
You're the only one in 27, they got a policy here of no roommates.

TOM
Hi.

CUT TO ED IN THE ADJOINING CELL. INTERCUT THROUGHOUT THE FOLLOWING, AS REQUIRED.

ED
What's your name?

TOM
Tom.

ED
Mine's Ed.

TOM
Pleased to meet you, Ed.

ED
Same here. Welcome to our exclusive club. Not everybody can get in, you know.

TAKE TOM AS HIS FACE CLOUDS OVER. AND TAKE IT OUT.
MUSIC: BRIDGE




next up: ACT III
Edited by Matt, Sep 5 2010, 06:10 PM.
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Matt
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ACT III

TOM'S JAIL CELL AND ADJOINING CELL. MORNING. CONTINUATION OF PRECEDING SCENE.

ED
Hey, Tom -- you like peanut butter sandwiches?

TOM
Peanut butter sandwiches?

ED
Yeah.

TOM
Well, I can take them or leave them alone.

ED
Good.

TOM
Good? Why?

ED
I'll tell you why. When they bring us lunch in a couple of hours, ask for an extra peanut butter sandwich. They'll give it to you -- they're very big on peanut butter sandwiches around here.

TOM
But I don't even like them.

ED
That's the point: I'm crazy about them -- and when you get that extra one, I'll trade you for three candy bars I saved from last week. Okay, Tom?

TOM
Okay, Ed.

ED
Hey, you're all right, kid. I like you.

TOM
Thanks.

ED
(BEAT) You married, Tom?

TOM
No. Are you?

ED
No, I never had the time for it.

TOM
Good for you, Ed.

ED
Yeah. (BEAT) Hey, Tom --

TOM
Yes.

ED
I'm in here for breaking and entering. I'll be out in a month. What'd they get you on? When'll you be out?

(TOM TENSES. FROWNS. RELAXED MOOD GONE AS HE AGAIN SLUMPS FORLORNLY IN THE CORNER OF HIS CELL)

ED
With some luck, I could be gone in two weeks -- why don't we meet then and I'll buy you a couple of peanut butter sandwiches. (LAUGHS) Tom? (NO ANSWER) Tom? ...Hey, Tom, what's the matter, did I say something wrong? ...Tom?...

TAKE TOM'S DESPERATE, UNHAPPY EXPRESSION AND TAKE IT OUT.
MUSIC: BRIDGE




next up: ACT IV
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Matt
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ACT IV

BOOKSHOP LIVING ROOM. MORNING, SHORTLY AFTER BREAKFAST. LIZ IS READING A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ABOUT THE MURDER. BRING IN PAUL FROM TEH BEDROOM AREA. HE IS PUTTING ON HIS COAT AND TIE.

LIZ
-- I must have read this article about Tom and Michael Shea a dozen times -- the words are all running together -- and I still can't believe it. (READS) "Grandson of Prominent Attorney Held for Stepfather's Murder." Oh, no, Paul -- it just couldn't happen. (BEAT) But it did.

PAUL
I feel the same way about it. Working in a hospital, you keep seeing strange behavior by people you'd never expect it from -- but after a while you learn to accept it -- to believe that almost anybody is capable of doing almost anything. It's a terrying thought, but -- (POINTS TO NEWSPAPER) -- well, you're right -- it did happen. (KISSES HER CHEEK) 'Bye, dear. Unless one of my patients decides to germinate a new and previously undiscovered disease, I should be home by five o'clock.

LIZ
Oh, wonderful. I'll pick up some steaks and fix us a lovely --

PAUL
You will do nothing of the kind. When a young lady achieves your condition, she is required only to eat dinners -- not to fix them. Tonight I will prepare the gourmet delights.

LIZ
We'll starve.

PAUL
Now just a minute. My reputation as a chef --

(THERE IS AN ANXIOUS KNOCKING ON THE DOOR, PAUL OPENS IT. BRING IN AMANDA. SHE HOLDS AN OPENED NEWSPAPER)

AMANDA
Liz -- Paul -- did you see this? About --

LIZ
Yes, we saw it. How tragic.

AMANDA
The Hughes family -- they -- they've become my family. They've been so good to me. How -- how could this happen to them? (LOOKS AT THE PAPER) -- "Held for Stepfather's Murder." (TO PAUL) Can they print that? They don't know he did it, do they?

PAUL
They can print the news. If Tom has been arrested on suspicion of murder, they can print that.

LIZ
How is Nancy? The Hughes? When did you hear about this?

AMANDA
Last night. Don brought me home from dinner. We were all alone in the kitchen -- the family -- having such a nice time when Bob called.

LIZ
Grandpa Hughes? How is he taking it?

AMANDA
I don't know. He's gone to bed when Bob called. They decided not to tell him last night. I guess he must know by now.

PAUL
You didn't see the family this morning?

AMANDA
No. I left the house early, and had breakfast at the coffee shop. I -- didn't want to be in the way there.

LIZ
I know how you felt. When you're a guest -- no matter how close you are to the family -- there are times when you just don't want to intrude on their private grief.

PAUL
(LOOKS AT HIS WATCH. PATS AMANDA SYMPATHETICALLY) I'm terribly sorry, Amanda. If there's anything I can do -- I'll be at the hospital. (TO LIZ, KISSING HER AGAIN TENDERLY) Have a good day, Liz.

LIZ
You, too, dear. (PAUL EXITS) Sit down, Amanda. You don't have to open the bookshop for a few minutes. Could I fix you a cup of tea? (AMANDA SHAKES HER HEAD AS SHE SITS DOWN) In England, we believe a cup of tea solves everything. (A BEAT) Do you think I should call Nancy? Or do you think every time the telephone rings in the Hughes house they feel a stab of fear?

AMANDA
They might.

LIZ
A note would be better. You could take it when you go home tonight, couldn't you?

AMANDA
Yes. (A BEAT) Imagine -- arresting Tom Hughes. He's the least violent person I've ever met.

LIZ
Well, they say that under certain conditions anyone is capable of violence. How do we know what pressures Tom may have been under?

AMANDA
Liz, are you implying he really did this? (INDICATES THE PAPER)

LIZ
No, of course, not, I'm just saying that you can't rule it out. (BEAT) I've known for some time now that all wasn't well with Tom -- and so has his family.

AMANDA
Well -- yes. I knew that, too.

LIZ
Ever since I first came to America and stayed at the Hughes' home there have been problems with him. When I moved in, he moved out, you know. He refused to share a room with his father.

AMANDA
But that doesn't mean --

LIZ
It means that he could be a very disturbed young man. And he was in Vietnam and he was wounded. Who knows what the war may have done to him?

AMANDA
In many ways, he and Donald are so much alike. Nancy calls them the "different" ones in the Hughes family.

LIZ
Yes, they're "different" all right. Don is the only one of Nancy's children who really broke away.

AMANDA
I don't think any of them ever felt it necessary to "break away". They're adults. They can accept their parents as friends -- and love them as equals. You only run away from a family when you've never learned to accept them as people -- not just authority. I think Chris and Nancy have been strong, wise parents.

LIZ
Their strength didn't work with Tom.

AMANDA
Well, in Tom's case they're only his grandparents. I guess Tom is the product of a broken home, wouldn't you say?

LIZ
And a broken home has produced -- this -- ? (INDICATES NEWSPAPER. AMANDA FROWNS, SAYS NOTHING). My goodness, look at the time.

AMANDA
Didn't you say you have an appointment?

LIZ
I do indeed -- for two-thirty. I don't think I can make it.

AMANDA
Certainly you can, if you hurry. I'll get your coat. (AS AMANDA GOES FOR LIZ'S COAT, LIZ LOOKS UNEASY AND CONCERNED. AMANDA BRINGS BACK THE COAT, HOLDS IT FOR HER) Here, now take a cab and you'll be fine.

LIZ
Frankly, Mandy, I'm not sure I want to keep this appointment.

AMANDA
Why? Isn't it important to you?

LIZ
(BEAT) I really don't know whether it has any value for me or not. (BEAT) I really don't know. (MAKES HER DECISION) Well, at least it's a nice day to get out in the fresh air -- so sure, I'll go.

TAKE HER. TAKE AMANDA, PUZZLED. AND TAKE IT OUT.
MUSIC: BRIDGE




up next: ACT V
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Matt
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ACT V

BOB'S OFFICE. MORNING. BOB AND DAVID ARE GOING THROUGH A STACK OF MEDICAL HISTORY FOLDERS ON THE DESK. BOB LOOKS VERY TIRED.

DAVID
...Dr. Dixon has offered to look out for all of Dr. Shea's office patients until other arrangements are made. He's familiar with many of them anyhow.

BOB
(INDICATING A GROUP OF FOLDERS) Fine. And I'll take over this batch -- A through G. (A GRIM SMILE) A pretty cold-blooded way for a doctor to parcel out responsibility for a lot of human lives, isn't it? Alphabetically.

DAVID
Why not? If a patient is lucky and keeps getting the right doctor, he could live forever. (INDICATING ANOTHER GROUP OF FOLDERS) I'll take these -- H through R.

BOB
You know, David, I wonder how the patients feel when the doctor they've always believed in and counted on turns out to be just a mortal -- and weak and vulnerable -- as they are.

DAVID
If you're asking me what they're going to think about Dr. Shea's murder --

BOB
That's exactly what I'm asking you.

DAVID
Well, I'm sure they're going to be quite upset and disillusioned, more than if he had died a -- more conventional death. It will have a depressing effect on morale here in the hospital and we may even lose a few patients. But --

BOB
But?

DAVID
In a couple of months, it will all be forgotten and everything will be back to normal, because deep down, the patients knew all the time that doctors die just like everyone else. They just didn't want to admit it. It's simply a matter of -- (THE TELEPHONE RINGS. BOB PICKS IT UP, ANSWERS)

BOB
Dr. Hughes... Oh? ...Miss Thompson? How long ago? All right, put in a call for the emergency oxygen equipment, I'll be right down. (HANGS UP, STARTS TO EXIT. IN HIS FATIGUE, HE TRIPS, ALMOST FALLS, RECOVERS)

DAVID
(HELPS HIM) Bob, you haven't had any sleep since -- Shea was killed. Go home and get to bed, I'll follow up with your patient.

BOB
Thanks, David -- but no. Miss Thompson is my patient. I have to follow up with her myself.

DAVID
I'm a pretty good doctor.

BOB
(GRINS) Would you let me do it for you -- even if you were twice as tired as I am?

DAVID
(BEAT, THEN GRINS) Come on, Doctor -- I'll help you in case you try to fall down again.

TAKE THEM AS THEY EXIT.
DISSOLVE TO:
MISS THOMPSON'S HOSPITAL ROOM. A COUPLE OF MINUTES LATER. MISS THOMPSON IS IN BED BREATHING HEAVILY. BOB STANDS BESIDE HER, LISTENING THROUGH HIS STETHOSCOPE, DAVID NEARBY.

DAVID
What do you think?

BOB
I don't know -- it's strange. She's terminal -- and she knew it. But for weeks she's been fighting to stay alive, as though she had some unfinished business in life. (BEAT) But now she seems different -- I almost feel that she's somehow reached her goal and has no more reason to keep on fighting.

TAKE MISS THOMPSON. TAKE BOB.
AND TAKE IT OUT.
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jam6242
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Wow, thanks! This is around the time I first started watching the show so many of these characters are familiar to me. I don't remember who Amanda was though???
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Matt
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jam6242
Sep 21 2010, 08:15 PM
Wow, thanks! This is around the time I first started watching the show so many of these characters are familiar to me. I don't remember who Amanda was though???
Amanda was Amanda Holmes who was played by Deborah Steinberg Solomon from 1966-1970. If I remember my ATWT history correctly, Amanda was the secret daughter of Sara Fuller (played by Gloria deHaven from 1966-1967) but had been adopted by Bill & Ann Holmes (played by William Prince & Augusta Dabney from 1966-1967). In truth, Bill was actually Amanda's real father! Both Amanda and Sara were romantically involved in Don Hughes at the same time (without knowing their connection to one another) and I think Sara might have dated Bob at one point prior. Bill told Amanda the truth about Sara on his deathbed, but she refused to reveal the truth to Sara who was her romantic rival for Don. When Don & Sara made plans to marry, Amanda was furious and threatened to reveal the truth to Don with a letter Bill had written confirming her parentage. As Sara chased after Amanda, she suffered a fatal fall down the stairs. Amanda went on trial for Sara's murder and it nearly resulted in Chris & Nancy's divorce! Chris defended Amanda, but Nancy testified against her because Sara had been her close friend, which led to Chris cross-examining Nancy during the trial! Amanda was eventual found innocent, Chris & Nancy reconciled. Don & Amanda later dated, but she eventually left town when she realized he would never really love her.
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CarlD2


Thank you so much. I will have to read through all this.
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