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A History of "Days" Renewals: 1980-Present; Jason47's Weekly Thread: Week of 1/14-1/20
Topic Started: Jan 14 2013, 09:13 PM (895 Views)
Jason47
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JANUARY 1980:
Length of Contract: Two Years (April 1980-March 1982)
Per Ken Corday's autobiography.
After this, most likely there was a two-year pick-up (April 1982-March 1984) and a three-year pick-up (April 1984-March 1987).

NOVEMBER 1986:
Length of Contract: Three Years (April 1987-March 1990)
Statement: NBC President Brandon Tartikoff: "Days of Our Lives" is one of the greatest success stories in network daytime television. The show seems to get more and more vital each year, adding new popular characters to complement the audience's perennial favorites."

NOVEMBER 1989:
Length of Contract: Three Years (April 1990-March 1993)
No info could be found.

NOVEMBER 1992:
Length of Contract: Three Years (and two primetime specials) (April 1993-March 1996)
Variety Article: (11/8/92)

NBC and Columbia Pictures TV have finally come to terms, following extended negotiations, on a three-year renewal for the long-running serial "Days of Our Lives"--the top-rated daytime show on NBC's third-rated lineup. The announcement, which indicates a significant commitment to the daypart, comes after a recent overhaul of NBC's daytime schedule in which the web canceled another of its soaps, "Santa Barbara," as well as "Dr. Dean" (Daily Variety, Sept. 30). "Barbara" will have its final airing Jan. 15, to be replaced by an as-yet-unspecified game show.

The agreement will result in 780 additional episodes of "Days" and also guarantees at least two prime time spex to air in conjunction with "Soap Opera Digest Awards"--a daytime-goes-prime time strategy the network tried out with some success last January. It's been expected for some time that NBC and CPT would eventually make a deal on the sudser, though ABC may have upped the ante by reportedly pursuing the show with an eye on trying to create an all-soap daytime block.

"Days" celebrated its 27th year on the network during a ceremony last Friday and generally pulls about a 16 share, while NBC's daytime sked averages only an 11 share overall. NBC's other remaining shows are "Classic Concentration,""Faith Daniels" and "Another World." With the cancellation of "Doctor Dean" NBC will reduce its daytime schedule to four hours each weekday, down from 5 1/2 hours.

NOVEMBER 1995:
Length of Contract:
Three Years (April 1996-March 1999)
Weekly Budget: $1.2 Million/per week (per Sept. 1998 article)
No info could be found.

SEPTEMBER 1998:
Length of Contract: Five Years (April 1999-March 2004) (with a 5-year option for 2004-2009)
Weekly Budget: $1.9 Million/per week (per June 2003 article)
Variety Article: (9/25/98) (By Josef Adalian)

SAN ANTONIO -- Columbia TriStar and NBC will announce today that "Days of Our Lives" will be staying at the Peacock for many days to come, barring any last-minute snags. While a deal had not been signed late Thursday, the studio and the web have hammered out most of the details of a five-year agreement that will keep the long-running soap on NBC until 2004, ending months of media reports speculating that "Days" might jump networks.

Insiders estimate NBC will pay a license fee of between $1.6 and $1.8 million per week -- about $360,000 per hourlong epi-sode -- for the right to broadcast the daily shenanigans that take place in the show's fictional town of Salem. That's an increase of approximately 50% from the roughly $1.2 million per week NBC has reportedly been paying. NBC also has an option to renew the show, which has been with the Peacock since its 1965 bow, for another five years.
While both sides always indicated a desire to keep "Days" on NBC, both ABC and CBS had expressed interest in stealing away the sudser, with the Alphabet web making the most serious play for the show. ABC's bid for "Days" may have been hampered, according to sources, by the web's refusal to give Columbia TriStar a financial stake in All My Soaps, an all-suds cabler now being tested by ABC in several markets. Still, ABC remained a wild card in the negotiations right up to the end of the renewal saga, and could reemerge as a player should there be some unexpected hitch before a deal is inked.

In addition to money, a major area of contention had been exclusivity. The Peacock and its affiliates have been upset over Columbia TriStar's decision earlier this year to begin offering same-day repeats of "Days" to DirecTV satellite subscribers. It's unclear whether the studio will drop its DirecTV offer as part of the new agreement, though sources at the studio have said for months that the satellite repeats were not lucrative enough to stand in the way of a deal with NBC. Any renewal deal for "Days" could spell bad news for NBC's other veteran sudser, "Another World." The Peacock has been actively developing a new soap, and many believe the new soap might replace the low-rated "World" sometime next year.

JUNE 2003:
Length of Contract:
Five Years (April 2004-March 2009)
Weekly Budget: $1.7 Million-1.8 Million/per week
Variety Article: (6/2/03) (By Josef Adalian)

NBC and Sony Pictures Television have inked a five-year deal worth nearly $500 million to keep hit sudser "Days of Our Lives" on the Peacock through May 2009. In addition, former "Days" head scribe Jim Reilly -- who left to create NBC sudser "Passions" -- has signed on to oversee writing on both skeins. Ken Corday will continue to exec produce "Days," the saga of the Horton and Brady families created by his parents nearly 40 years ago. Both pacts were engineered on the Peacock side by NBC senior VP of daytime Sheraton Kalouria, who's also been doing some dealmaking on his own behalf: Exec has just reupped for another three years as head of the daytime unit.

Deal for "Days" was negotiated quietly over the past few months -- a dramatic departure from five years ago, when NBC and Sony engaged in a prolonged license fee battle that had Sony and Corday Prods. seriously considering moving the skein to another network. The two sides ultimately inked a deal that hiked the show's license fee nearly 50%. This time around, the changing economics of daytime TV -- specifically, declining Nielsen numbers for almost all sudsers -- resulted in a less contentious dealmaking process. Indeed, NBC's business affairs team, led by topper Marc Graboff, managed to strike a deal with Sony calling for a reduced license fee.

Peacock now will shell out roughly $1.7 million-$1.8 million per week for "Days," down from the nearly $1.9 million the net had been paying. That figure still makes "Days" the most expensive sudser in daytime and is well above the $1.2 million NBC paid for "Days" years ago. Net also agreed to another five-year deal -- a big guarantee of security for Sony and Corday Prods. in a universe of shrinking sudser auds.

Sony Pictures TV topper Steve Mosko said that, with his studio's recent restructuring of its small-screen operations, "Taking care of our core assets was key, and 'Days' is one of our core assets. "It was important for us to renew the show for a long time," he added. "People talk about hits in terms of months and years, but with 'Days,' we're talking decades. It's an important show for us, for NBC and the viewers." "Days" remains a solid daytime performer, ranking first among women 18-34. Its numbers have slipped during the past 18 months, however, and the skein has surrendered its former hold on first place with women 18-49.

Key to the "Days" deal was convincing Reilly to oversee both shows. Scribe helped the sudser soar to the top spot among women 18-49 during his first go-round as head writer from 1992-97, and with "Passions," he created what appears to be a long-term franchise for NBC. Corday had some initial concerns about Reilly splitting his time, but Kalouria said all parties ultimately realized it made sense to bring back Reilly. "What Ken and I both agree on is that Jim is the right guy to be the creative leader overseeing the next wave of stories for 'Days,' " Kalouria said. "We saw in Jim someone who had a proven track record, and we wanted to bring him back."

Corday said he was "thrilled" about the long-term deal, noting the Peacock's commitment to the show in an era when nets are more reluctant than ever to sign multiyear deals. "I was riding in an elevator with some producers who were talking about (their show getting picked up for 10 episodes). I was able to say, 'I just got picked up for 1,300," Corday quipped. "NBC has stood by us for a long time, and we're glad they're willing to give us five more years even though the market is tougher than it's ever been." Corday also said he welcomed Reilly's return. "I had qualms about it at first only because it's a huge task to write five shows a week, and now you're asking him to write 10 shows," he said. "But Jim has the appetite and the skills, so away we go."

New deal also gives Sony expanded repurposing rights for "Days." Studio already had the right to air same-day episodes of the sudser on cable, and that remains a possibility in the coming year. Now, however, studio also will be able to offer "Days" segs over the Internet, with viewers able to download episodes the same afternoon they air on NBC. "We will be looking at the potential of doing that," Mosko said, noting the studio already offers a Net version of its CBS sudser "The Young & the Restless."

NOVEMBER 2008:
Length of Contract:
18 Months (April 2009-September 2010) (Plus a one-year automatic pick-up based on Nielsen ratings through September 2011, which was picked up by NBC)
Weekly Budget: $1.05 Million/per week (per Ken Corday's autobiography...40% cut of last contract) (New shooting schedule goes into effect: no more overtime/Saturday tapings; must be out by 6PM each day; tape a full month of episodes in 3 weeks; studio dark for a week once per month)
Variety Article (11/11/08) (By Michael Schneider)

NBC has inked a deal with Sony Pictures TV to extend its run of daytime sudser "Days of Our Lives." But in a sign of uncertain times for the daytime soap biz, the Peacock's pickup runs just 18 months. The previous renewal pact between Sony and Corday Prods. had a five-year term. NBC's current deal for "Days of Our Lives" was set to expire in March, which means the new arrangement will keep the soap on the network only through September 2010. However, it's understood that another year will be triggered if certain perameters on the show are met. That would keep "Days" on the air through September 2011.

Shortened renewal comes as the economics of daytime TV -- particularly soap operas -- continue to sour. NBC has gradually eliminated most of its daytime sudsers, most recently moving "Passions" to DirecTV (before eventually pulling the plug on that show altogether). The reup also comes despite rumblings from NBC Universal topper Jeff Zucker a few years ago that "Days of Our Lives" might not be renewed at all. More recently, Zucker hasn't been as vocal about a "Days" cancellation, although the short renewal could signal that NBC's long-term daytime plans may not include sudsers.

It's unclear whether NBC also negotiated a reduced license fee for the show. The Peacock was most recently shelling out $1.7 million-$1.8 million a week for the show. As part of the renewal it's understood that the show, led by exec producer Ken Corday, will be making some onscreen changes as well, including some cast shuffles. Season-to-date "Days of Our Lives" is tied for third place in the daypart among women 18-49 and is tied as the No. 1 show in women 18-34. SoapNet holds same-day repurposing rights for "Days," which is also available for download via Apple's iTunes. The soap is celebrating its 43rd anniversary.


MARCH 2010:
Length of Contract:
One Year Automatic Pick-up (October 2010-September 2011)

NBC Press Release: (3/19/10)

NBC has picked up hit daytime drama "Days of our Lives" for its 45th season, keeping the long-running show on the network through the 2010-11 television season, it was announced today by Marc Graboff, Chairman, NBC Entertainment and Universal Media Studios. "'Days of our Lives' continues to be a favorite of the daytime audience and we are thrilled to keep it going through its 45th season," said Graboff. "'Days' has shown year-to-year increases in key female demographics and remains both relevant and fresh creatively." Bruce Evans, Senior Vice President, Drama Programming, NBC Entertainment, added, "The producers, cast and crew have worked tirelessly to make 'Days' the ratings success it is today. Today's renewal is a true testament to all of their hard work. We could not be more delighted for them and for the multiple generations of fiercely loyal 'Days of our Lives' fans." The acclaimed daytime drama will celebrate its 45th anniversary on Monday, November 8.

"Days of our Lives" (Monday-Friday, 1-2 p.m. in most markets; check local listings) first premiered as a half-hour drama in 1965 and expanded to an hour 10 years later. Today, it remains a consistent favorite among viewers of daytime television serials and is currently tied for #2 for the season among all daytime dramas in women 18-49 and women 18-34. Through 25 weeks of the 2009-10 season, "Days" is averaging 3.3 million viewers, its highest average at this point in the season in three years and a 10 percent increase over its audience of one year ago, according to Nielsen Media Research. "Days" is also delivering year-to-year gains among women 18-49 and women 25-54. In its 44-plus years, "Days of our Lives" has garnered numerous Emmy Awards and nominations, as well as multiple Soap Opera Digest and People's Choice Awards. "Days of our Lives" is set in the fictitious Midwestern town of Salem. The core families are the Bradys, the Hortons and the DiMeras, and the multi-layered storylines involve elements of romance, adventure, mystery, comedy and drama.

"Days of our Lives" is produced by Corday Productions Inc., in association with Sony Pictures Television. Executive producer Ken Corday is following in the tradition of his parents, Betty and Ted Corday, who co-created "Days of our Lives" and helmed the series for many years. Gary Tomlin is also executive producer. Dena Higley is the head writer and Christopher Whitesell is co-head writer.

NOVEMBER 2010:
Length of Contract:
Two Years (October 2011-September 2013)
Variety Article (11/8/10): (By Stuart Levine)

"Days of Our Lives" looks to be one of the survivors among the thinning herd of daytime soaps. As the show marked its 45th anniversary, NBC on Monday gave the sudser a two-year renewal. Venerable sudser is No. 1 for daytime dramas in the teen 12-17 demo and No. 2 in women 18-34. Through six weeks of the new season, "Days" is averaging 2.6 million viewers. Produced by Corday Prods. and Sony Pictures Television, "Days" is exec produced by Gary Tomlin. Dena Higley is the head writer.

"'Days of Our Lives' remains vitally creative through the years as it continues to draw new generations of viewers, especially among its loyal female audience," said Jeff Gaspin, chairman of NBC Universal Television Entertainment. "NBC salutes the series on its 45th anniversary, and we look forward with great anticipation to working with the production team for the years to come." Show began as a half-hour drama in 1965 and expanded to an hour 10 years later. "Days" is the last sudser remaining on the Peacock. Network canceled "Passions" in August 2008. In the past year, CBS axed two of its long-running soaps, "As the World Turns" and Guiding Light."

NBC Press Release: (11/8/10)
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. November 8, 2010 NBC has picked up its daytime drama "Days of our Lives" which is celebrating its 45th season today on NBC -- for two more years through the 2012-13 season. The announcement was made today by Jeff Gaspin, Chairman, NBC Universal Television Entertainment. "Days of our Lives" remains vitally creative through the years as it continues to draw new generations of viewers, especially among its loyal female audience" said Gaspin.

"NBC salutes the series on its 45th anniversary and we look forward with great anticipation to working with the production team for the years to come. This important and enduring series is an iconic part of NBC's history as well as that of daytime drama, said Bruce Evans, Senior Vice President, Current Programming, NBC Entertainment. "The creative team, cast and crew work hard each day to ensure that "Days" continues to remain fresh and relevant to its legions of devoted fans across the country.

"With great joy, I am pleased to announce the best news any soap opera could receive. "Days of our Lives" has been picked up through September of 2013, said Ken Corday, executive producer of "Days." "We extend our greatest gratitude to NBC for blessing us with the gift of such an amazing commitment. We continue to be big believers in the serialized daytime drama and we're thrilled that our great partners at NBC have renewed "Days of our Lives," said Steve Mosko, president, Sony Pictures Television. An iconic global brand, "Days" entertains millions of loyal, engaged viewers, on television and online, in the US and around the world.

"Days of our Lives" (Monday-Friday, 1-2 p.m. in most markets; check local listings) first premiered as a half-hour drama in 1965 and expanded to an hour 10 years later. Today, it remains a consistent favorite among viewers of daytime television serials and is currently tied for #4 for the season among all daytime dramas in women 18-49, tied for #2 in women 18-34 and tied for #1 among girls 12-17, according to Nielsen Media Research. Through six weeks of the 2010-11 season, "Days" is averaging 2.6 million viewers. In its 45 years, "Days of our Lives" has garnered numerous Emmy Awards and nominations, as well as multiple Soap Opera Digest and People's Choice Awards. "Days of our Lives" is set in the fictitious Midwestern town of Salem. The core families are the Bradys, the Hortons and the DiMeras, and the multi-layered storylines involve elements of romance, adventure, mystery, comedy and drama.

JANUARY 2013:
Length of Contract:
One Year (October 2013-September 2014)
NBC Press Release: (1/9/13)

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – January 09, 2013 – On the heels of celebrating its 12,000th episode, NBC has extended its long-running daytime drama "Days of our Lives" for an additional year, taking the show through September 2014 and past its 48th year anniversary in November 2013. The extension was announced today by Jennifer Salke, President, NBC Entertainment. The 12,000th episode will air this Friday, January 11.

“We are thrilled to announce that “Days of our Lives” is not going anywhere. It is NBC's longest-running drama series by far and is one of the most historic brands in television,” said Salke. “We commend Ken Corday and the entire creative team on continuing to keep the stories and characters fresh, exciting and relevant year after year.”

“‘Days of our Lives’ has maintained a loyal and dedicated fan base for more than four decades and continues to reach a new generation of viewers,” said Steve Mosko, President, Sony Pictures Television. “We appreciate NBC’s support over the years and, as the show celebrates this significant milestone, we are thrilled that the show will continue to be a part of the NBC family.”

Executive producer Ken Corday follows in the tradition of his parents, Betty and Ted Corday, who co-created "Days of our Lives" and helmed the series for many years. “After so many years in the homes and hearts of our loyal fans, I’m both humbled and elated to say it’s 2013 and we’re still going strong,” said Corday. “I am equally proud that the sense of family which my mom and dad established in our show 48 years ago, is still what drives it today. As we celebrate our 12,000th episode with an amazing cast and great support from our network, we look forward to what’s yet to come!”

In the 12,000th episode, Sami (played by Alison Sweeney, who coincidentally celebrates her 20-year anniversary on “Days” this week) and Rafe (Galen Gering) start getting close again. Chloe (Nadia Bjorlin) finds an ally in her quest to win Daniel (Shawn Christian) away from Jennifer (Melissa Reeves). Meanwhile, Gabi (Camila Banus) prepares to marry Nick (Blake Berris) while carrying the baby of Will (Daytime Emmy winner Chandler Massey). All three continue to struggle with what role Will should play in the baby’s life. Before the episode’s end, someone throws a huge wrench into the wedding proceedings.

"Days of our Lives” (Monday-Friday, 1-2 p.m. ET) first premiered as a half-hour drama in 1965 and expanded to an hour 10 years later. In its 47-plus years, “Days of our Lives” has garnered 215 Daytime Emmy nominations and 32 wins, including a recent Emmy win for Outstanding Writing as well as a GLAAD Award win for Outstanding Daily Drama. The show's success derives from its consistent commitment to excellence in writing and storytelling -- supported by a diverse ensemble of performers -- and an uncanny knack for anticipating viewer interests. "Days” is set in the fictitious midwestern town of Salem. The core families are the Bradys, the Hortons and the DiMeras. The multi-layered storylines involve elements of romance, adventure, mystery, comedy and drama.

“Days of our Lives” is produced by Corday Productions Inc. in association with Sony Pictures Television. Ken Corday is executive producer with co-executive producers Greg Meng and Lisa De Cazotte. Gary Tomlin and Christopher Whitesell are the head writers.
Edited by Jason47, Jan 14 2013, 10:15 PM.
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Interesting info. Thanks for sharing.
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eyebrowns


It's the budget cut news that always kill me. I can't help but wonder what stories they could be telling now if NBC had a little faith in them still.

Thank you!
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