Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]



Hello, soap fans -- and welcome to Daytime Royalty!

For those unfamiliar, we are an uncensored community for fans and lovers of the daytime genre. We have a no-holds-barred atmosphere in regards to the shows, writers, actors etc. but we do not allow member bashing in any form.

You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.

Join our community!

If you're already a member, please log in to your account to access all of our features.

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Jason47's Weekly Thread: Week of 2/3-2/9; UPDATE # 4: The 1964 "Days" proposal begins...Tom Horton is introduced!
Topic Started: Feb 3 2014, 10:24 PM (905 Views)
Jason47
Member Avatar


Jason47 Presents...The "Days of Our Lives" Proposal, 1964...PART ONE

Coming over the next few weeks, a look back at the "Days of Our Lives" proposal, written 50 years ago in 1964. The 16-page document is a general overview written about Salem and its characters, and was used to help market the potential series to various production companies. Screen Gems ended up buying the idea on September 15, 1964. NBC liked the idea enough to have a pilot episode made in July 1965, and Macdonald Carey and Mary Jackson were hired to play Tom and Alice. When NBC viewed the pilot, they decided to make the pilot into a series, and Frances Reid was hired to replace Mary Jackson in the role of Alice. And now, as "Days" fans get ready to celebrate the show's 50th anniversary next year, here's how things all began, when "Days" only existed on paper...


In Salem City -- a city large enough to support a municipal college and yet not quite large enough to attract a major league baseball club -- TOM and ALICE HORTON are living out the days of their lives.

They own their own home, a forty-year-old frame house that has become old-fashioned and even a little anachronistic in the changing neighborhood.

Tom has two jobs. He is professor of internal medicine at the medical school and staff internist in the University Hospital. Too young to have been in the first world war, he saw a great deal of service with the Medical Corps in the South Pacific during the second war.

An obscure man, little known outside of the confines of Salem City, Tom was once something of a minor celebrity in many cities. That was during his college days when, as a young husband and father, he also followed two callings: his main calling, as a student of medicine, and the more lucrative job he kept to pay the family and university bills. That job was as a baseball player on a top minor league club, and he was a sensationally good player.

Despite the blandishments of many major league club owners and the pleas of his own wife, Tom Horton quit baseball cold the day he received his medical degree -- for that was also the day he started his internship at the old Friends' Hospital in Salem City.

He has never regretted walking out on what fame and fortune might have awaited him had he remained in baseball. Tom always had a peculiarly old-fashioned idea that money is only a mean to an end, and not an end in itself. Dr. Thomas Horton, as a grown man, was never able to earn as much money in his chosen profession as he had been offered for playing a children's game while he was still a very young man.

He could have earned more money, perhaps. Good internists are very rare. But, because they are, and because Tom is a natural born teacher, he found his destiny in teaching younger men to become internists, and in serving on the staff of the University Hospital for a stipend that was little more than nominal. He went into internal medicine as a student, remained as a teacher, and never once did he put his profession to more economically rewarding uses. The only time he ever left the campus after his student days was to serve in the Army Medical Corps during the second world war.

He has now been a teacher long enough to have become a 'second father' to generations of individual students. Often, years after they have become parents and doctors themselves, his former students will return with new pleas for help, or even for sympathy, as they find themselves in situations they cannot resolve for themselves.

Coming soon: Tom's introduction story continues, and we get to learn about his wife, Alice, for the very first time!

ALLAN CHASE: THE FACTS REVEALED ABOUT THE THIRD "DAYS" CREATOR

In all my years of research, I could never connect a novelist named Allan Chase, who donated his papers to a library in Illinois, to be THE Allan Chase who helped create "Days of Our Lives." Although the library catalogue lists many books and even TV projects worked on by Chase, nothing is mentioned about "Days" in that catalogue. Thanks to a re-filing of a lawsuit filed by the executors of co-creator Irna Phillips after her death, the identity of Chase became even more mysterious, when the lawsuit stated his whereabouts were no longer known as of 1976. But, now, after all these years, the 1964 "Days" proposal mentions that Chase was the novelist I had thought him to be (but could never prove).

Allan Chase led quite an interesting life. He was born in New York City on April 19, 1913. He began his career as a newspaper reporter in the early 1930's. In the 1940's, he started writing novels. Several of the books he wrote, including "Falange: The Axis Secret Army in the Americas" and "The Five Arrows", made U.S. authorities think he was a Communist, and he was brought in for official questioning on the matter on July 2, 1953, appearing before Joseph McCarthy, the famous senator who tried to out many people in the entertainment industry and elsewhere as being Communists.

In Chase's testimony, which was unsealed and released to the public 50 years after the fact in 2003, we learn a few facts about the man himself. Chase's full name is Allan Chase (he had no middle name); he was born in, as he states, "the city of New York, borough of Manhattan" and resided at the time at 725 West End Avenue in New York City. Chase was then questioned directly by Dr. J.B. Matthews: "Mr. Chase, do you believe that the FBI fakes evidence against people?" Chase replied: "No, sir." Chase then confirmed that he was a secretary of the American Committee for Spanish Freedom and stated that the organization was cited as a Communist front by the attorney general after he left the organization. He then stated he knew that he left that organization by September 12, 1945, because that was the date his daughter (Deborah) was born. Chase then admitted he was a Communist for a mere two weeks in 1934. He said "I felt like the Rabbi who wandered into a house of burlesque in Boston without knowing what he had wandered into. I saw and heard and by the time I realized what I had gotten into, I picked up my hat and feet and ran." Chase went on to state that in 1934, he was 20 years old, the US had 20 million unemployed, and he was vitally concerned with one issue at that time: the Spanish War. After Chase told the committee that he was writing an anti-Communist book, and that if he were called to testify in public session that it would ruin the book, the committee decided to not call Chase to testify publicly, and even told Chase that the testimony he gave today will not be made public. That promise, of course, was held for 50 years, until these documents (as with many government documents) were released 50 years after the fact.

After Chase's committee questioning, he became involved in the television and motion picture business and worked off-and-on in the industry from around 1953-1965. Some sources list him as the creator of the CBS soap "Valiant Lady" (which ran from 1953-1957, and in which Ted Corday directed; however other sources state that Adrian Spies was the show's creator). IMDB also lists Chase as writing episodes of "77 Sunset Strip" in 1960 and "The Defenders" in 1964. After he was named as one of the creators of "Days" in the show's proposal in late 1964, Chase seems to have then left the entertainment industry behind and went on to his next love: researching and writing books about medicine.

In his later years, Chase became focused on researching and writing about medicine. He reported and commented about medicine and public health for "Medical Tribune" from 1976-1981. He also wrote three books dealing with the subject: "The Legacy of Malthus", about scientific racism, in 1977; "Magic Shots", a history of vaccines, in 1982; and "The Truth About STD", about sexually transmitted diseases, in 1983. He was also a visiting lecturer at the University of Illinois in 1979. Near the end of his life, Chase was working on books about the history of nutrition, tuberculosis, AIDS and the legalization of drugs, and was also writing his memoir (called "The Summer of 1941"), but he passed away on June 22, 1993 before having a chance to publish any of those books. Chase was married for many years to his wife, Martha.

As Maureen Russell's 1995 book, "Days of Our Lives: A Complete History of the Long-Running Soap Opera", stated: "Allan Chase worked with Ted Corday on a number of projects in New York. He was credited in the early years of the show because he had been in on the initial planning. His input was minimal, and he is no longer credited with the show's creation." However minimal Chase's input was, it's nice to finally confirm who he was and to finally have some facts for "Days" fans to learn about this no-longer mysterious figure in "Days" history!

JASON47 NOW HAS A COPY OF ONE OF THE EARLIEST PIECES OF "DAYS" HISTORY...THE SHOW'S FULL PROPOSAL FROM SEPTEMBER 1964...JUST IN TIME FOR THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS WRITING!

This proposal, written in September 1964, is basically a "pre-bible" of the series, and, when pitched to Screen Gems (now Sony) was what helped make Screen Gems executive Jackie Cooper agree to buy the idea and make a pilot, which NBC would then purchase and make a series in 1965.

The proposal also helps finally confirm that the mysterious third creator of "Days", Allan Chase, is the novelist who passed away in 1993. He was my best guess as to who Allan Chase really was, but due to the lack of any conclusive evidence over the years, the proposal's statements about Chase finally confirm him to be the novelist.

More info to follow....find out what Tom Horton's original claim to fame was, what Julie's birth name was supposed to be, who Bobby Horton ended up becoming...and lots more!!


PREVIOUS UPDATE:
Kayla makes her first appearance in 2014 later this week; Ian Patrick Williams' character (The Gentleman) finally has his name, Percy Ruggles, said on air; and Jonathon Trent makes his debut as Rory's older brother, Kurt.

Principal Guest Stars: Week of Monday 2/3/14-Friday 2/7/14

John Aniston - Victor Kiriakis
Mary Beth Evans - Kayla Brady
Judi Evans - Adrienne Kiriakis
Bryan Dattilo - Lucas Horton
Lauren Boles - Ciara Brady
Kevin Riggin - Rory
Brendan Coughlin - Tad Stevens
Aloma Wright - Maxine Landis
Allison Paige - Bev
Meredith Scott Lynn - Anne Milbauer
Michael Benyaer - Dr. Chyka
Ian Patrick Williams - Percy Ruggles
Jade Harlow - Sheryl Connors
Glenn Keogh - Brother Timothy
Larry Poindexter - Father Louis
Les Brandt - Ricardo
Jonathon Trent - Kurt (new)
Terry James - Stunt Coordinator

Posted Image
Edited by Jason47, Feb 5 2014, 12:11 PM.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
BradyB


I always like reading stunt coordinator. Wonder what goes down this week?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DiMeraFan67
Member Avatar


BradyB
Feb 3 2014, 10:49 PM
I always like reading stunt coordinator. Wonder what goes down this week?
Probably the Daniel/Nicole vs Chyka and Chyka vs Ricardo stuff.

I like Rory so it's cool that he's getting a brother. I would rather develop Bev's family since she could be a potential pairing for JJ or someone else. But they will probably bring her dad in eventually. Wonder what goes on with Rory's brother.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jason47
Member Avatar


JASON47 NOW HAS A COPY OF ONE OF THE EARLIEST PIECES OF "DAYS" HISTORY...THE SHOW'S FULL PROPOSAL FROM SEPTEMBER 1964...JUST IN TIME FOR THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS WRITING!

This proposal, written in September 1964, is basically a "pre-bible" of the series, and, when pitched to Screen Gems (now Sony) was what helped make Screen Gems executive Jackie Cooper agree to buy the idea and make a pilot, which NBC would then purchase and make a series in 1965.

The proposal also helps finally confirm that the mysterious third creator of "Days", Allan Chase, is the novelist who passed away in 1993. He was my best guess as to who Allan Chase really was, but due to the lack of any conclusive evidence over the years, the proposal's statements about Chase finally confirm him to be the novelist.

More info to follow....find out what Tom Horton's original claim to fame was, what Julie's birth name was supposed to be, who Bobby Horton ended up becoming...and lots more!!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jason47
Member Avatar


ALLAN CHASE: THE FACTS REVEALED ABOUT THE THIRD "DAYS" CREATOR

In all my years of research, I could never connect a novelist named Allan Chase, who donated his papers to a library in Illinois, to be THE Allan Chase who helped create "Days of Our Lives." Although the library catalogue lists many books and even TV projects worked on by Chase, nothing is mentioned about "Days" in that catalogue. Thanks to a re-filing of a lawsuit filed by the executors of co-creator Irna Phillips after her death, the identity of Chase became even more mysterious, when the lawsuit stated his whereabouts were no longer known as of 1976. But, now, after all these years, the 1964 "Days" proposal mentions that Chase was the novelist I had thought him to be (but could never prove).

Allan Chase led quite an interesting life. He was born in New York City on April 19, 1913. He began his career as a newspaper reporter in the early 1930's. In the 1940's, he started writing novels. Several of the books he wrote, including "Falange: The Axis Secret Army in the Americas" and "The Five Arrows", made U.S. authorities think he was a Communist, and he was brought in for official questioning on the matter on July 2, 1953, appearing before Joseph McCarthy, the famous senator who tried to out many people in the entertainment industry and elsewhere as being Communists.

In Chase's testimony, which was unsealed and released to the public 50 years after the fact in 2003, we learn a few facts about the man himself. Chase's full name is Allan Chase (he had no middle name); he was born in, as he states, "the city of New York, borough of Manhattan" and resided at the time at 725 West End Avenue in New York City. Chase was then questioned directly by Dr. J.B. Matthews: "Mr. Chase, do you believe that the FBI fakes evidence against people?" Chase replied: "No, sir." Chase then confirmed that he was a secretary of the American Committee for Spanish Freedom and stated that the organization was cited as a Communist front by the attorney general after he left the organization. He then stated he knew that he left that organization by September 12, 1945, because that was the date his daughter (Deborah) was born. Chase then admitted he was a Communist for a mere two weeks in 1934. He said "I felt like the Rabbi who wandered into a house of burlesque in Boston without knowing what he had wandered into. I saw and heard and by the time I realized what I had gotten into, I picked up my hat and feet and ran." Chase went on to state that in 1934, he was 20 years old, the US had 20 million unemployed, and he was vitally concerned with one issue at that time: the Spanish War. After Chase told the committee that he was writing an anti-Communist book, and that if he were called to testify in public session that it would ruin the book, the committee decided to not call Chase to testify publicly, and even told Chase that the testimony he gave today will not be made public. That promise, of course, was held for 50 years, until these documents (as with many government documents) were released 50 years after the fact.

After Chase's committee questioning, he became involved in the television and motion picture business and worked off-and-on in the industry from around 1953-1965. Some sources list him as the creator of the CBS soap "Valiant Lady" (which ran from 1953-1957, and in which Ted Corday directed; however other sources state that Adrian Spies was the show's creator). IMDB also lists Chase as writing episodes of "77 Sunset Strip" in 1960 and "The Defenders" in 1964. After he was named as one of the creators of "Days" in the show's proposal in late 1964, Chase seems to have then left the entertainment industry behind and went on to his next love: researching and writing books about medicine.

In his later years, Chase became focused on researching and writing about medicine. He reported and commented about medicine and public health for "Medical Tribune" from 1976-1981. He also wrote three books dealing with the subject: "The Legacy of Malthus", about scientific racism, in 1977; "Magic Shots", a history of vaccines, in 1982; and "The Truth About STD", about sexually transmitted diseases, in 1983. He was also a visiting lecturer at the University of Illinois in 1979. Near the end of his life, Chase was working on books about the history of nutrition, tuberculosis, AIDS and the legalization of drugs, and was also writing his memoir (called "The Summer of 1941"), but he passed away on June 22, 1993 before having a chance to publish any of those books. Chase was married for many years to his wife, Martha.

As Maureen Russell's 1995 book, "Days of Our Lives: A Complete History of the Long-Running Soap Opera", stated: "Allan Chase worked with Ted Corday on a number of projects in New York. He was credited in the early years of the show because he had been in on the initial planning. His input was minimal, and he is no longer credited with the show's creation." However minimal Chase's input was, it's nice to finally confirm who he was and to finally have some facts for "Days" fans to learn about this no-longer mysterious figure in "Days" history!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matt
Member Avatar
Classic Soap Fan

BradyB
Feb 3 2014, 10:49 PM
I always like reading stunt coordinator. Wonder what goes down this week?
Probably for Abby climbing EJ. It must be risky for an actress to work at those heights without a net.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matt
Member Avatar
Classic Soap Fan

I am SO psyched to read this pre-bible/proposal you have NO idea! I'm such a total geek for these things. :)
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jason47
Member Avatar


Matt
Feb 4 2014, 10:56 PM
I am SO psyched to read this pre-bible/proposal you have NO idea! I'm such a total geek for these things. :)
Any guesses as to who Bobby Horton ended up becoming??
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matt
Member Avatar
Classic Soap Fan

Jason47
Feb 4 2014, 11:31 PM
Matt
Feb 4 2014, 10:56 PM
I am SO psyched to read this pre-bible/proposal you have NO idea! I'm such a total geek for these things. :)
Any guesses as to who Bobby Horton ended up becoming??
I really want to say that Bobby ended up becoming Tommy. I actually think I've read this somewhere before.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jason47
Member Avatar


Matt
Feb 5 2014, 01:39 AM
Jason47
Feb 4 2014, 11:31 PM
Matt
Feb 4 2014, 10:56 PM
I am SO psyched to read this pre-bible/proposal you have NO idea! I'm such a total geek for these things. :)
Any guesses as to who Bobby Horton ended up becoming??
I really want to say that Bobby ended up becoming Tommy. I actually think I've read this somewhere before.
Not Tommy...he was Daniel originally. Will post some snippets from the proposal later in the week!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Jason47
Member Avatar


Jason47 Presents...The "Days of Our Lives" Proposal, 1964...PART ONE

Coming over the next few weeks, a look back at the "Days of Our Lives" proposal, written 50 years ago in 1964. The 16-page document is a general overview written about Salem and its characters, and was used to help market the potential series to various production companies. Screen Gems ended up buying the idea on September 15, 1964. NBC liked the idea enough to have a pilot episode made in July 1965, and Macdonald Carey and Mary Jackson were hired to play Tom and Alice. When NBC viewed the pilot, they decided to make the pilot into a series, and Frances Reid was hired to replace Mary Jackson in the role of Alice. And now, as "Days" fans get ready to celebrate the show's 50th anniversary next year, here's how things all began, when "Days" only existed on paper...


In Salem City -- a city large enough to support a municipal college and yet not quite large enough to attract a major league baseball club -- TOM and ALICE HORTON are living out the days of their lives.

They own their own home, a forty-year-old frame house that has become old-fashioned and even a little anachronistic in the changing neighborhood.

Tom has two jobs. He is professor of internal medicine at the medical school and staff internist in the University Hospital. Too young to have been in the first world war, he saw a great deal of service with the Medical Corps in the South Pacific during the second war.

An obscure man, little known outside of the confines of Salem City, Tom was once something of a minor celebrity in many cities. That was during his college days when, as a young husband and father, he also followed two callings: his main calling, as a student of medicine, and the more lucrative job he kept to pay the family and university bills. That job was as a baseball player on a top minor league club, and he was a sensationally good player.

Despite the blandishments of many major league club owners and the pleas of his own wife, Tom Horton quit baseball cold the day he received his medical degree -- for that was also the day he started his internship at the old Friends' Hospital in Salem City.

He has never regretted walking out on what fame and fortune might have awaited him had he remained in baseball. Tom always had a peculiarly old-fashioned idea that money is only a mean to an end, and not an end in itself. Dr. Thomas Horton, as a grown man, was never able to earn as much money in his chosen profession as he had been offered for playing a children's game while he was still a very young man.

He could have earned more money, perhaps. Good internists are very rare. But, because they are, and because Tom is a natural born teacher, he found his destiny in teaching younger men to become internists, and in serving on the staff of the University Hospital for a stipend that was little more than nominal. He went into internal medicine as a student, remained as a teacher, and never once did he put his profession to more economically rewarding uses. The only time he ever left the campus after his student days was to serve in the Army Medical Corps during the second world war.

He has now been a teacher long enough to have become a 'second father' to generations of individual students. Often, years after they have become parents and doctors themselves, his former students will return with new pleas for help, or even for sympathy, as they find themselves in situations they cannot resolve for themselves.

Coming soon: Tom's introduction story continues, and we get to learn about his wife, Alice, for the very first time!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DAYSisHOT
Member Avatar


Jason47
Feb 4 2014, 11:31 PM
Matt
Feb 4 2014, 10:56 PM
I am SO psyched to read this pre-bible/proposal you have NO idea! I'm such a total geek for these things. :)
Any guesses as to who Bobby Horton ended up becoming??
Julie?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matt
Member Avatar
Classic Soap Fan

I actually remember reading somewhere (maybe it was the Maureen Russell book) that Tom had a baseball background. I'm glad that they just shortened the town name to "Salem". Salem City just sound cumbersome and unwieldy.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Marlene


This is wonderful, Jason. Thanks so much for sharing.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
nananana7


Jason47
Feb 5 2014, 12:10 PM
An obscure man, little known outside of the confines of Salem City, Tom was once something of a minor celebrity in many cities. That was during his college days when, as a young husband and father, he also followed two callings: his main calling, as a student of medicine, and the more lucrative job he kept to pay the family and university bills. That job was as a baseball player on a top minor league club, and he was a sensationally good player.

Despite the blandishments of many major league club owners and the pleas of his own wife, Tom Horton quit baseball cold the day he received his medical degree -- for that was also the day he started his internship at the old Friends' Hospital in Salem City.

He has never regretted walking out on what fame and fortune might have awaited him had he remained in baseball. Tom always had a peculiarly old-fashioned idea that money is only a mean to an end, and not an end in itself. Dr. Thomas Horton, as a grown man, was never able to earn as much money in his chosen profession as he had been offered for playing a children's game while he was still a very young man.

Wow that reminds me of the character "Archie Moonlight Graham" (portrayed by Burt Lancaster) in the move "Field of Dreams"
-- and his wife's name was "Alicia".
By the way, Archie Graham was a real person.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonlight_Graham
http://old.post-gazette.com/pg/05176/528257.stm

Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Manny
Member Avatar


Wow, this is so interesting to read! Thank you, Jason! Can't wait for more!
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
DOOLette
Member Avatar


Jason47
Feb 5 2014, 12:10 PM
Jason47 Presents...The "Days of Our Lives" Proposal, 1964...PART ONE

Coming over the next few weeks, a look back at the "Days of Our Lives" proposal, written 50 years ago in 1964. The 16-page document is a general overview written about Salem and its characters, and was used to help market the potential series to various production companies. Screen Gems ended up buying the idea on September 15, 1964. NBC liked the idea enough to have a pilot episode made in July 1965, and Macdonald Carey and Mary Jackson were hired to play Tom and Alice. When NBC viewed the pilot, they decided to make the pilot into a series, and Frances Reid was hired to replace Mary Jackson in the role of Alice. And now, as "Days" fans get ready to celebrate the show's 50th anniversary next year, here's how things all began, when "Days" only existed on paper...


In Salem City -- a city large enough to support a municipal college and yet not quite large enough to attract a major league baseball club -- TOM and ALICE HORTON are living out the days of their lives.

They own their own home, a forty-year-old frame house that has become old-fashioned and even a little anachronistic in the changing neighborhood.

Tom has two jobs. He is professor of internal medicine at the medical school and staff internist in the University Hospital. Too young to have been in the first world war, he saw a great deal of service with the Medical Corps in the South Pacific during the second war.

An obscure man, little known outside of the confines of Salem City, Tom was once something of a minor celebrity in many cities. That was during his college days when, as a young husband and father, he also followed two callings: his main calling, as a student of medicine, and the more lucrative job he kept to pay the family and university bills. That job was as a baseball player on a top minor league club, and he was a sensationally good player.

Despite the blandishments of many major league club owners and the pleas of his own wife, Tom Horton quit baseball cold the day he received his medical degree -- for that was also the day he started his internship at the old Friends' Hospital in Salem City.

He has never regretted walking out on what fame and fortune might have awaited him had he remained in baseball. Tom always had a peculiarly old-fashioned idea that money is only a mean to an end, and not an end in itself. Dr. Thomas Horton, as a grown man, was never able to earn as much money in his chosen profession as he had been offered for playing a children's game while he was still a very young man.

He could have earned more money, perhaps. Good internists are very rare. But, because they are, and because Tom is a natural born teacher, he found his destiny in teaching younger men to become internists, and in serving on the staff of the University Hospital for a stipend that was little more than nominal. He went into internal medicine as a student, remained as a teacher, and never once did he put his profession to more economically rewarding uses. The only time he ever left the campus after his student days was to serve in the Army Medical Corps during the second world war.

He has now been a teacher long enough to have become a 'second father' to generations of individual students. Often, years after they have become parents and doctors themselves, his former students will return with new pleas for help, or even for sympathy, as they find themselves in situations they cannot resolve for themselves.

Coming soon: Tom's introduction story continues, and we get to learn about his wife, Alice, for the very first time!
Jason, I don't know how you do what you do, but THANK YOU for doing it! Always fascinating.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
1 user reading this topic (1 Guest and 0 Anonymous)
ZetaBoards - Free Forum Hosting
ZetaBoards gives you all the tools to create a successful discussion community.
« Previous Topic · DAYS: News, Spoilers & Discussion · Next Topic »
Add Reply